.
C O N T E N T S
SECOND AU FALL LANDSCAPE SCHOOL COMING SOON
PEONY PROJECT UPDATE
HOUSE VOTES FOR $11 BILLION SUPPLEMENTAL HURRICANE AID PACKAGE
NEW PRIVATE APPLICATOR FORM
EFFECTS OF PRUNING, DEFOLIATION AND PROMALIN ON NEW SHOOT DEVELOPMENT OF BOXWOOD
GEORGIA/FLORIDA GREEN INDUSTRY UPDATES
HOSTA RESPONDS TO BA CROWN DRENCHES
MUGWORT - A CONTINUING PROBLEM
THE DIFFICULTIES OF ESTABLISHING Kalmia latifolia
PLANT PATHOLOGY REPORT - AUGUST 2004
UPCOMING EVENTS

Hello Everyone,

Hurricanes do not help the workload at this time of the year. It depends on who you are as to the damage that was caused. Some small nurseries with a couple of greenhouses that were smashed by a fallen tree were devastated. Some large nurseries had to unleash an army of workers to stand up containers and replace plastic as well as some shingles but will survive OK. Some field nurseries were hit hard with large trees looking like they were grabbed and put in a spin cycle before blowing over. The trees sunk leaving what some called a donut tree with roots broken in a circle and the tree sunk into a hole in the center. Calls to North Carolina, who in recent years dealt with this problem, indicated that their efforts to stand and stake many of the large trees was wasted if the roots were broken close to the tree. See the pictures at our web site if you are not viewing this newsletter from there. The pictures were taken September 16, 2004.

ALFA is doing a good job of keeping up with assistance available which seems slim for the nursery industry. Bill Turk from Martins Nursery and current president of the Alabama Nursery and Landscape Association made an impassioned plea to the Commissioner of Agriculture, Ron Sparks, for help for our industry. The Commissioner was very receptive and promised his support. Check the web site below for the latest information from ALFA.

Educational Opportunities
Life goes on and two very important programs are approaching fast. The Southern Region IPPS and the AU Fall Landscape School.

Southern Region IPPS will be in Greenville, SC on October 24th through the 27th. It is THE nursery meeting of the year. Auburn University Horticulture Department is sending 2 bus loads of students to the event. We believe it is a great introduction to our industry for the students and an equally great opportunity for you. I hope you can get away. It will be well worth your time and money.
Go to http://www.ipps.org/SouthernNA/programs.html to get a full view of the program and tours.

Alabama Certified Landscape Professional Exam
The AU Fall Landscape School will be on November 4th and 5th and the program is outlined below. Part of the program is the teaching and the practical test for the Alabama Certified Landscape Professional Exam. This is not a regulatory license. It is a voluntary program that separates you and your company from the heap. It tells your customers that you have attained a higher level of professionalism within your industry and they can have confidence in your knowledge and work. This is the first practical exam. The written exam was given for the first time at SNA but you do not have to take them in order. You need to register with Linda VanDyke at the ALNLA (334-821-5148) to get a manual and pay for the exam. You could just take the exam without the classes and just read the manual but we want to make sure you do well. We offer this training so there will be no surprises when you take the practical exam. I hope you will take advantage of this opportunity to promote your business.

New Regional Extension Agents (REA’s) for Commercial Horticulture Team
The Alabama Cooperative Extension System (ACES) has revamped and overhauled “The System” and is currently launching a new, leaner but more focused educational service. The change helps us adapt to the fewer dollars and people in ACES. The key concept in the renovation was to concentrate on some primary agricultural areas and do them well. Commercial Horticulture and Home Horticulture surfaced as 2 of the 13 priority agricultural focus areas. The system offers 6 new dedicated regional commercial horticulturists to serve the turf, nursery, landscape, professional grounds maintenance, greenhouse, Christmas tree, fruit, nut and vegetable industries. There are also two other specialists that have responsibilities in smaller more targeted areas. Their job is to work strictly with the commercial horticulture enterprises in their regions. Listed below are the new REA’s and the counties they represent along with their phone numbers. Invite them to your business or local county meetings so you can get to know them. The State Specialists, REA’s and county agents will be working as a team to concentrate on the educational needs of the commercial horticulture industry. As always, we will be partnering with you to jointly plan the best use of the Teams' time and efforts.

The Commercial Horticulture Team also includes about 30 agents and state specialists with partial responsibilities to commercial Horticulture. Our commodity specialists will continue to lead and work with the Regional Agents to develop and deliver research-based educational opportunities and assistance. Depending on your commodity area, you will recognize Dr. Ken Tilt as the Nursery, Christmas Tree and Landscape Specialist, Dr. David Han as the Turf Specialist, Dr. Raymond Kessler as the Greenhouse Specialist, Dr. Joe Kemble as the Vegetable Specialist and Dr. Bill Goff as the Pecan or Nut Crop Specialist. There are a number of supporting specialists from agronomy and soils, entomology, agricultural economics, pathology and other areas that support and lead in our horticultural efforts.

Dr. Tilt has the Team leadership responsibility. His job is to stimulate and coordinate communication among the members and help identify and facilitate opportunities among the members and industry to foster economic development. He is also the liaison with the Extension Administration to express the needs and concerns of the team.

We are excited to have this new emphasis on our industry. Please help us make this new system work.

New Regional Agents (REA’s) and their counties
DOUG CHAPMAN: Northwest Tennessee Valley Region
Lauderdale, Limestone, Madison, Colbert, Franklin, Lawrence, Morgan, Marion, Winston, Walker
Contact him by phone at 256-232-5510, fax 256-230-0015

GARY GRAY: Central West Alabama Black Belt Region
Lamar, Fayette, Pickens, Tuscaloosa, Bibb, Chilton, Jefferson, Shelby, Sumpter, Greene, Hale and Perry
Contact him at 205-280-6268 or fax 205-280-6357

DAVID HUBBARD
David will offer Commercial support in the Birmingham area with Gary Gray.
Contact him at 205-325-5342 ext. 39 or fax 205-325-5690

JAMES MILES: Southwest Alabama Coastal Region
Choctaw, Marengo, Wilcox, Dallas, Clarke, Monroe, Washington, Conecuh, Mobile, Baldwin, Escambia
Contact him by phone at 251-574-8445 ext. 51 or fax 251-574-3245

CHAZZ HESSELEIN Chazz will offer commercial support in Mobile and Baldwin Counties with a specialty in pest management with James Miles primarily in greenhouse and nursery crops.
Call him at 251-342-2366, fax 251-342-1022

DAN PORCH: Northeast Alabama Sand Mountain Region
Jackson, Marshall, Dekalb, Cullman, Blount, Etowah, Cherokee, St. Clair, Calhoun
Contact him at the Blount County Extension office-205–274–2129

CHIP EAST: East Alabama Piedmont Region
Talladega, Cleburne, Clay, Randolph, Coosa, Tallapoosa, Chambers, Autauga, Elmore, Lee, Montgomery, Macon, Russell
Call him at the Cleburne County office at 256-463-2620

ERIC CROWDER: Southeast Alabama Wire Grass Region
Lowndes, Butler, Covington, Pike, Bullock, Barbour, Crenshaw, Coffee, Geneva, Dale, Henry, Houston
Contact him at 334-774-2329 ext. 25 or fax 334-445-1031

Have a great October,
Ken

DISCLAIMER: Please remember that all information presented is a summary of research and not an endorsement of any product or a recommendation of chemicals. The official labels from the manufacturing companies offer the legal and proper use and handling information for all products.


SECOND AU FALL LANDSCAPE SCHOOL COMING SOON

The AU Fall Landscape School (November 4 and 5, 2004) is brought to you by the Horticulture Department at Auburn University in cooperation with the Alabama Nursery and Landscape Association, the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, and the USDA Risk Management Agency. We have assembled a program filled with a diverse array of experts from academia and the green industry.

The Alabama Nursery and Landscape Association is the recipient of a grant from the Risk Management Group. Their help makes it possible for us to offer you two days of instruction for a very affordable $140 which includes all lectures and workshops (with the exception of the Build-A-Pond, which has its own fee schedule), lunch on Thursday and break refreshments.

Thursday, November 4, 2004
7:30 - 8:30 Registration (AU Hotel & Conference Center)

Session A - Plants and Design (AU Hotel and Conference Center)

8:30 - 9:30
LANDSCAPE TREE SELECTION
Harry Ponder, AU Horticulture

9:30 - 10:30
WEED CONTROL BASICS IN TURF
Steve Larson, BASF

10:30 - 11:30
GARDEN DESIGN TRENDS FOR UPSCALE RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPES
Troy Rhone, Integrity Landscape

11:30 - 1:00 - Lunch - Deli buffet with dessert

1:00 - 2:00
AZALEAS FOR THE SOUTH: BEYOND CORAL BELLS AND FORMOSA
Gary Keever, AU Horticulture

2:00 - 3:00
TURFGRASS FROM THE SCHOOL OF HARD KNOCKS
Wayne Bassett, Beck’s Turf, Inc.

3:00 - 3:30 - Break

3:30 - 4:30
TROPICAL THEMING FOR TEMPERATE LANDSCAPES
Hayes Jackson, ACES

4:30 - 5:30
NEW AND UNDER-UTILIZED SHRUBS FOR THE LANDSCAPE
Mark Mayeske, ACES

Session B Business (AU Hotel and Conference Center)

8:30 - 9:30
ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE LAWN AND LANDSCAPE SECTOR, Deacue Fields, ACES

9:30 - 10:30
BASIC TAX LAWS & CURRENT ISSUES
Tomm Johnson, AL Dept of Agriculture

10:30 - 11:30
WHAT PUBLIC GARDENS OFFER THE LANDSCAPE INDUSTRY
Harvey Cotton, Huntsville Botanical Gardens

11:30 - 1:00 - Lunch - Deli buffet with dessert

1:00 - 3:00
Landscape Industry Panel
CHALLENGES ON THE HORIZON FOR THE LANDSCAPE INDUSTRY
Steven Presley, Landscape Workshop
Brian Word, Black Jack Landscapes
Moderator: Dave Bradford, Landscape Services

3:00 - 3:30 - Break

3:30 - 4:30
DEALING WITH DIFFICULT PEOPLE
Bill Sauser, AU Business and Engineering Outreach

4:30 - 5:30
USING THE MEDIA TO SPIN YOUR COMPANY
Jodi Robinson

Session C - Practicum (Ham Wilson Livestock Arena)

Spend time with industry professionals and field specialists:
8:30 - 9:15 Plan Layout
9:15 - 10:00 Grading
10:00 - 10:45 Tree Planting
10:45 - 11:30 Sod Installation
11:30 - 1:00 Lunch provided on site
1:00 - 2:00 Job Evaluation of Installation and Maintenance
2:00 - 3:00 Equipment Operation
3:00 - 3:30 Break
3:30 - 4:30 Pesticide Application and Safety
4:30 - 5:30 Pruning

Session D - Build a Pond Workshop (Ag Heritage Park)

8:30 - 3:30
Aqua-Scapes and CASSCO
Lunch provided on site

Friday, November 5
7:30 - 8:30
Registration (AU Hotel and Conference Center)

Session E - Pest Management (AU Hotel and Conference Center)

8:30 - 9:30
EFFECTIVE INSECT CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR THE LANDSCAPE
Chazz Hesselein, ACES

9:30 - 10:30
PESTICIDE USE NEAR LAKES, PONDS, AND STREAMS
Wheeler Foshee, AU Horticulture

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 -12:00
WEED CONTROL PRODUCTS FOR USE IN HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS
John Everest, ACES

12:00 - 1:00 - Lunch on your own

1:00 - 2:00
NEW PRODUCTS FOR PEST MANAGEMENT IN THE LANDSCAPE
Mickey Lovett, Syngenta

2:00 - 3:00
PRACTICAL WEED MANAGEMENT IN LAWNS
David Han, ACES

3:00
Adjourn

Session F - More Stuff (AU Hotel and Conference Center)

8:30 - 9:30
ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY LANDSCAPE PRACTICES
Jeff Sibley, AU Horticulture

9:30 - 10:30
BUSINESS STRATEGIES TO MAXIMIZE THE BOTTOM LINE
Jeff Sibley, AU Horticulture

10:30 - 11:00
Break

11:00 -12:00
TIPS FOR EFFECTIVE COST ESTIMATING AND BIDDING
Fred Kapp

12:00 - 1:00 - Lunch on your own

1:00 - 2:00
STRUCTURES IN THE LANDSCAPE
Jim Cothran, Robert & Company, Atlanta

2:00 - 3:00
COTTAGE GARDENS
Dave Williams, AU Horticulture

3:00
Adjourn

For more information please contact Dr. David Williams at 334-844-3032 or by email at jdwillia@acesag.auburn.edu


PEONY PROJECT UPDATE

When pressed for a no-data, no-statistic personal opinion of what peonies were doing best in the trials at the Anniston location, Hayes Jackson, Extension County agent and PhD graduate student at Auburn, gave the following list with a major disclaimer of one year does not a test make!! Here is his preliminary good southern peony list so far. Early singles seem to perform better.

  • Gold dotted red butterfly
  • Buddha lotus seat
  • Cinnabar red
  • Pink jade
  • Pink from seed
  • Xishi pink
  • Radiant beauty
  • Emerald lotus

Below are photos of three of Hayes' selections. We will upload the others to our Peony Project website in the near future. To see more peony photos go to http://www.ag.auburn.edu/landscape/AU_Peony_Project.html

Buddha's Lotus Seat

Radiant Beauty

Xishi Pink


HOUSE VOTES FOR $11 BILLION SUPPLEMENTAL HURRICANE AID PACKAGE

Excerpts directly quoted from Washington Ag Update

On Wednesday the House voted for a supplemental hurricane aid package totaling nearly $11 billion that included aid for states that were affected by damage due to Hurricane Jeanne and Ivan. The bill includes $507 million specifically for agriculture producers who suffered from crop losses in 2003 and 2004 and to provide repairs for damaged rangeland and pastureland.

The House supplemental bill largely mirrors the Administration’s request and contains emergency assistance to producers who have obtained crop insurance through the federal Risk Management Agency and would pay producers at 50 percent of the established insurance policy price for that crop. Producers who do not have coverage for their crop because crop insurance is not offered would also be eligible for payment at 50 percent of the state average price. However, this proposal contains a payment limit of $80,000 per producer and also a means test that requires producer’s to certify their income from agriculture production.

To read the entire press release go to http://www.alfafarmers.org/ag_update/index.phtml?id=4132


NEW PRIVATE APPLICATOR FORM

To all who have responsibilities for training private applicators (relative to the purchase and use of restricted pesticides), The Department of Agriculture and Industries has increased the fee for a private applicator permit to $25.00. Please contact Fudd Graham by phone at 334-844-2530 or 334-844-2563 or by email: fgraham@acesag.auburn.edu. He can send you the form via email. Use it to replace the application form in all private applicator training (PAT) packets. According to Dr. Pat Morgan at the Department of Agriculture & Industries, this increase is effective immediately.


EFFECTS OF PRUNING, DEFOLIATION, AND PROMALIN ON NEW SHOOT DEVELOPMENT OF BOXWOOD

Boxwood, a popular shrub, typically produces a flush of growth in spring accompanied by shoot elongation. After that the bud break ceases and the plant remains dormant for the rest of the year and only grows slightly in a rather erratic manner. Defoliating and shoot pruning can effect hormonal levels and activity in the plant which can then effect how dormant it remains. Plant growth regulators (PGRs) can be used to alter plant hormonal activity. Promalin, a plant growth regulator, has been used to induce lateral shoot formation, shoot elongation, or both in many woody ornamentals. It has been used in combination with defoliation, pruning, and nutrient application to induce shoot growth in plants. More research needs to be done to determine what combination of factors: Promalin, pruning, defoliation can impact the growth of boxwood to allow for new shoot development and the potential for the production of larger plants in the same amout of time resulting in increase in revenues.

(from "Effect of Pruning, Defoliation, and Promalin on New Shoot Development of Boxwood" by Sheri Musselwhite, Roger Harris, Joyce Latimer, and Robert Wright, published in the Journal of Environmental Horticulture, September 2004)

GEORGIA/FLORIDA GREEN INDUSTRY UPDATES

Georgia and Florida may be great rivals on the football field, but not in the classroom. For almost a decade, faculty from the two institutions have been teaming up to provide Green Industry Professionals with one-day updates on a wide variety of current topics. Participants in the 2004 updates will learn about new technologies, new products and new environmental issues while earning pesticide re-certification credits from their respective state's Department of Agriculture. The 2004 updates are set for October 12 in Kingland, Georgia; October 13 in Quincy, Florida; and October 14 in Cairo, Georgia.

The October 12 and 13 updates are primarily for landscape professionals and offer such topics as trouble-shooting tree problems, managing citrus in urban environments, pest-resistant plants and managing seasonal color beds. The October 14 session offers topics of interest to nursery and greenhouse professionals, including new weed control methods and products, nursery runoff management and pest scouting techniques. Each session combines classroom lectures with outdoor hands-on activities. Participants from Georgia earn 3 hours of pesticide re-certification credit by attending the Kingsland program and 4 credit hours by attending the Quincy or Cairo program.

For additional information, phone the Tifton Campus Conference Center at 229/386-3416 or print-off the complete agenda and register on-line at the Conference Center's Web site: http://www.ugatiftonconference.org/greenindustry/default.htm

For more information contact: Gary L. Wade, Professor and Extension Program Coordinator - Horticulture
221 Hoke Smith Building
Cooperative Extension Service
The University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602-4356
Phone: 706/542-2861, 542-2340; FAX: 706/542-2375; email: gwade@uga.edu


HOSTA RESPONDS TO BA CROWN DRENCHES

Hostas are propagated in the nursery industry by crown division. The slow development of new offsets has prompted the industry to look for a method that would encourage quicker growth. In the past foliar sprays of benzyladenine (BA) have been applied to established plants for this purpose. This research demonstrated that crown drenches of 2000 or 3000 ppm BA applied at either division or establishment were as effective as a foliar spray of 3000 ppm BA. Material and labor costs of applying crown drenches, however, are greater than those associated with foliar sprays.

(from "Response of Hosta to BA Crown Drenches Applied at Division and Establishment" by Jennifer C. Warr and Gary J. Keever, published in the Journal of Environmental Horticulture, September 2004).

MUGWORT - A CONTINUING PROBLEM

Mugwort is a non-native perennial aster (also called false chrysanthemum) that has made it to the top 10 list of most problematic weeds in eastern US nurseries. It is spread by rhizome pieces that contaminate cultivation equipment and root balls of nursery crops. When mugwort rhizomes are cut into tiny pieces during rototilling (as small as 1/4 inch) they can survie and regenerate within 45 days even if there were no leaf scales on the pieces. Pine bark grew the greatest number of rhizomes. Mugwort grown in soil produced fewer plants but they had the highest root and shoot biomasses. This study looked at the regenerative potential of mugwort rhizome sections transplanted into common substrates in landscape and nursery fields, container nurseries, and propagation beds.

Nine Canadian provinces and half of the US are hosts to this plant. While it was named a noxious weed in Maitoba it isn't listed as a federal or state noxious weed in the US and has even been offered for retail sale. This weed is also problematic for home gardeners and landscape maintenance professionals.

(from "Regeneration of Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) from Rhizome Sections in Sand, Pine Bark, and Soil Substrates" by William E. Klingeman, Darren K. Robinson, and Gary L. McDaniel, published in the Journal of Environmental Horticulture, September 2004).

THE DIFFICULTIES OF ESTABLISHING Kalmia latifolia

Mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) has been called 'the perfect shrub' because of its value to the nursery industry, its beauty and the extent of its range. It is a broad-leaf evergreen shrub that can grow to the size of a small tree in a variety of soil types and in a wide range of environmental conditions. All of this certainly recommends it to growers, homeowners and landscape designers. The problem, however, is that when you try to transplant container-grown mountain laurel (commonly propagated by tissue culture and grown in pinebark substrate) the results are often very unsatisfactory. Many plants die in the process. According to this study, transplanting in the fall (in climates similar to the Appalachian Mountain region of Western Virginia) will improve transplant survival and subsequent growth. Fall is preferred as a time to transplant since capacity for maximum root extension into the backfill will be greater than for spring transplants. Since the plants will not be in bloom in the fall a marketing strategy would be to sell plants with pictures attached of what the blooms will look like.

(from "Effects of Transplant Season and Container Size on Landscape Establishment of Kalmia latifolia L" by Anne-Marie Hanson, J. Roger Harris, and Robert Wright, published in the Journal of Environmental Horticulture, September 2004).

PLANT PATHOLOGY REPORT - AUGUST 2004

Jackie Mullen
Extension Plant Pathology Specialist

Jim Jacobi
Extension Plant Pathology Specialist-Birmingham

Charles Ray
Research Fellow IV-Auburn

Auburn Plant Disease Report - August 2004
(Jackie Mullen)

Many of our 159 plant samples in August were ornamental and turf problems. Some of the problems seen included azalea with Phytophthora nicotiana aerial blight, bermuda with Bipolaris crown rot, boxwoods planted too deep, many samples of shade trees with anthracnose leaf spot diseases, a variety of trees and herbaceous plants with powdery mildew.

Aerial blight on azalea caused by Phytophthora nicotiana has been diagnosed on azaleas twice this past summer. Symptoms of brown leaf spots and blight are not diagnostic and could be confused with a variety of foliage leaf spot diseases. ELISA tests confirmed the presence of a Phytophthora and culture work showed the pathogen to be P. nicotiana. This is not a common occurrence on azaleas. P. nicotiana has been recognized as a crown and root rot pathogen of azaleas, but we do not typically see it as a leaf spot foliage disease. Fungicides listed in the Pest Management Handbook for Phytophthora shoot blight control (Heritage, Daconil Ultrex, Subdue, etc.) should provide protective disease control of this disease. Check with Austin Hagan if you have questions on disease control.

We received boxwood plants showing severe dieback. Also lower stems and roots were showing decay. The plants were planted about 3 inches too deep. Roots were present along the buried lower stems. Woody plants generally will not tolerate too deep planting, and dieback, crown and root rot will develop after 3-4 years in this stressed situation. The lower stems need oxygen and should be exposed to air. If buried under soil, lower buried stem & associated root tissues will die. If the problem is discovered early after planting (first 1-2 years), the plants should be dug up and replanted. Once the plants begin to show symptoms of dieback, it is usually too late to remedy the problem.

Fungal leaf spot diseases (including anthracnose and several other fungal leaf spots) and powdery mildews are often common occurrences on the pre-senescing foliage of woody plants that will soon drop their leaves. Powdery mildew and fungal leaf spots also develop on herbaceous plants in early fall. Powdery mildews will develop more when moderate temperatures fluctuate between day and night and when humidity is high. At this time of year, sanitation (clean up of fallen leaves and dying plants) is the only recommendation.

In late July we received a landscape holly with dieback, crown rot, and root decay. Phytophthora root rot was diagnosed. Continued observation of some slow growing cultures have confirmed the crown rot to be caused by the fungus Cylindrocladium. This fungal crown rot is not a common disease, but it does occur. It is not a water mold and is not dependent on overly wet conditions. Control involves removal of damaged plants. As this is not a common problem, studies on disease control have not been done in our area. Check with Austin Hagan if you have further questions on disease control.

AUGUST 2004 Plant Diseases Seen In The Auburn Plant Diagnostic Lab
PLANTPROBLEMCOUNTY
AzaleaPhytophthora nicotiana Aerial Blight *
BermudaBipolaris Crown RotJefferson
BermudaDollar Spot (Sclerotinia)Jefferson
BermudaRhizoctonia Brown Patch Jefferson
BoxwoodPlanted Too Deep *
CentipedeTake-all Patch (Gaeumannomyces
graminis
var. graminis)
Montgomery
CotoneasterPhytophthora Root RotTallapoosa
DogwoodCercospora Leaf SpotMobile
ElmZonate Leaf Spot (Cristulariella)Butler
ForsythiaBacteria Leaf SpotLawrence
Holly, CompactaAnthracnose Cankers*, Tuscaloosa
Holly, CompactaFusarium Canker *
Holly, CompactaPhytophthora Root RotMontgomery
Maple, JapaneseAnthracnoseLee
Maple, JapaneseBotryosphaeria Canker *
ZoysiaDollar Spot (Sclerotinia)Lee
*Counties are not reported for greenhouse and nursery samples.

Birmingham Plant Disease Report - August 2004
(J. Jacobi)

We received 120 samples during August. Problems seen last month included Armillaria root rot on arborvitae and hemlock, gall midge damage on azalea, bacterial leaf scorch on American elm and pin oak, leaf spots (caused by Colletotrichum, Cercospora, Corynespora) on hydrangea, and lace bug on lantana.

We continued to get samples of red oaks (primarily pin oak) that tested positive (using ELISA) for bacterial leaf scorch (Xylella fastidiosa). Last month we also had an American elm sample test positive for the disease. On elms, bacterial leaf scorch (BLS) and Dutch elm disease (DED) look somewhat similar from a distance. Both diseases occur in our area. One difference between the two diseases is that the symptoms of DED are usually seen in early summer (June), compared to mid-late summer (July-September) for BLS. Another difference between the two diseases is that DED causes brown discoloration o the sapwood of branches, while BLS does not cause discoloration. Lastly, trees infected with DED usually die within one to two years, while trees infected with BLS decline over a period of time. The following publication provides more information on BLS

(http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR1050/). Lantana lace bug (Teleonemia scrupulosa) has caused considerable damage to lantana in the Birmingham area. Often plants damaged by lace bugs will stop flowering. To identify lantana lace bug, look for upper leaf surfaces that are mottled or speckled yellow or white and green. On lower leaf surfaces, look for droplets of brown excrement, cast skins, and adult lace bugs. See the following web page for more information and control options (http://www.aces.edu/dept/extcomm/newspaper/june17a03.html).

AUGUST 2004 Plant Diseases Seen In The Birmingham Plant Diagnostic Lab
PLANTPROBLEMCOUNTY
ArborvitaeArmillaria Root RotJefferson
AzaleaGall MidgesJefferson (2)
AzaleaLacebugsJefferson (3)
BentgrassAnthracnose*
BentgrassFairy Ring *
BermudagrassBipolaris Leaf SpotJefferson
BermudagrassDollar Spot (Sclerotinia)Jefferson
BermudagrassSpiral NematodesJefferson
Boxwood, CommonMacrophoma Leaf SpotJefferson
Boxwood, CommonPhytophthora Root RotJefferson (2)
Boxwood, EnglishPythium Root RotJefferson
Butterfly Weed (Asclepias)
Milkweed BugJefferson
Camellia, SasanquaAnthracnose (Colletotrichum)Jefferson
Camellia, SasanquaCotton Camellia ScaleJefferson
Camellia, SasanquaTea ScaleJefferson
CannaLarger Canna LeafrollerJefferson
CentipedegrassLocalized Dry SpotJefferson
Cherry LaurelShot Hole (Cercospora)Jefferson
Cherry LaurelShot Hole (Xanthomonas)Jefferson
Cherry LaurelSouthern Red MiteShelby
Cherry LaurelWhite Peach ScaleShelby
Crape MyrtleCercospora Leaf SpotJefferson
Crape MyrtlePowdery MildewJefferson, Shelby
Crape MyrtleSuspect Roundup InjuryCullman
Cypress, LeylandBotryosphaeria CankerJefferson
Cypress, LeylandCercosporidium Needle BlightShelby
Dogwood, KousaCercospora Leaf SpotJefferson
Elm, AmericanBacterial Leaf Scorch (Xylella)Jefferson
Hawthorne, IndianEntomosporium Leaf SpotJefferson
HemlockArmillaria Leaf SpotJefferson
Hydrangea, BigleafAnthracnose (Colletotrichum)Jefferson
Hydrangea, BigleafCercospora Leaf SpotCullman/Jefferson
Hydrangea, BigleafCorynespora Leaf SpotJefferson
Hydrangea, Oak LeafSooty MoldMadison
Jasmine, AsiaticAmbrosia BeetleJefferson
JasmineFalse Spider MiteJefferson
LantanaLantana Lace BugJefferson
LiriopeAnthracnose (Colletotrichum)St. Clair
Maple, JapaneseBotryosphaeria CankerJefferson
Maple, JapanesePhysiological Leaf ScorchJefferson
Maple, RedAnthracnoseJefferson
Maple, RedZonate Leaf Spot (Cristulariella)Jefferson
Mondo GrassPythium Root RotJefferson
Oak, PinBacterial Leaf ScorchJefferson (2)
PachysandraVolutella BlightJefferson (2)
PeonyCercospora Leaf SpotJefferson
RhododendronBotryosphaeria CankerJefferson (2)
St. AugustinegrassChinch BugsJefferson (2)
ZoysiaTwo-lined SpittlebugsJefferson
ZoysiaWhite Grub (May-June BeetleJefferson (2)
ZoysiaZoysiagrass MiteShelby
*Counties are not reported for greenhouse and nursery samples.

AUGUST 2004 Insects Identified at the Auburn Plant Diagnostic Lab (C. Ray)
COUNTY CROP CATEGORY SPECIMEN NAME
Lamar Roadside Miscellaneous Japanese Beetle
Russell Lawn Turfgrass Juvenile Millipedes
Dale Tree Ornamental Bumblebee
Elmore Lawn Turfgrass Tiger Beetle
Butler Trees Ornamental Green Lynx Spider
Crenshaw Lawn Turfgrass Yellow-Necked Caterpillar
Jefferson Indica Azalea Ornamental Rhododendron Tip Midge, Spider Mite, Snail
Jefferson Blackjack Oak Ornamental A Gall Midge, Tydeid Mites, Stigmaeid Mites, Tarsonemid Mites
Chilton Sod Turfgrass Sugarcane Beetle
Marengo Lantana Ornamental Lantana Lacebug
Lee . Miscellaneous Fishing Spider
Mobile St. Augustine Sod Turfgrass No Arthropod Detected
Marion Wood Forest Pandora Sphinx Moth
Lee Azalea Ornamental Azalea Caterpillar
Pike Cypress Ornamental Bagworms and Tarsonemid Mites
DeKalb . Miscellaneous Lady Beetle Larvae-probably Twice-Stabbed
Morgan Blue Point Juniper Ornamental Maskell Scale and Spider Mites
Morgan Blue Point Juniper Ornamental Maskell Scale (few) and Spider Mites
Calhoun Oak Ornamental Damage from a leaf skeletonizer poss. Oak Leaf Skeletonizer
Lee Angel Trumpet Ornamental Geometrid Moth Larva


UPCOMING EVENTS

October 1-2, 2004:
Middle Tennessee Nursery Association Horticultural Trade Show.
McMinnville Civic Center, McMinnville, TN
Contact Ann Halcomb, MTNA Exec. Secr., P.O. Box 822, McMinnville, TN 37111-0822; phone: 931-668-7322; fax: 931-668-9601; e-mail: mtna@blomand.net,
http://www.mtna.com/ or http://www.southeasternnursery.com/mtna/

October 3-6, 2004:
IPPS Southern Region NA
Greenville/Spartanburg, S.C.
Contact: Dr. David L. Morgan, 332 Warbler Drive, Bedford, TX 76021; phone 817-577-9272; e-mail, dleemorgan@msn.com

October 22, 2004:
Second Annual Henry P. Orr Memorial Golf Classic
FarmLinks Golf Club, Fayetteville, AL
All proceeds will benefit the Henry P. Orr Endowed Fund for Horticultural Excellence
For more information call Linda Van Dyke at 334-821-5148 or Katie Hardy at 334-844-1475

November 4-5, 2004:
Auburn University Fall Landscape School.
Auburn University. Contact Dr. Dave Williams (334-844-3032 or jdwillia@acesag.auburn.edu)

January 19-22, 2005:
Gulf States Horticultural Expo
Mobile Convention Center, Mobile AL
For more information contact Linda Van Dyke at 334-821-5148.

August 25-27, 2005:
The Farwest Show.
Portland, Oregon, Oregon Convention Center.
Contact Aimee Schendel, Oregon Association of Nurserymen, 29751 SW Town Center Loop West, Wilsonville, OR 97070; 800-342-6401; 503-682-5089 x 2006; Fax, 503-682-5099; e-mail, info@farwestshow.com
URL: http://www.farwestshow.com

September TBA, 2005:
The Southern Plant Conference.
Louisville, Kentucky.
Contact: Matt Gardiner, KY Coordinator, 502-245-0238: e-mail, matthew624@aol.com; or Betsie Taylor, KNLA Exec. Dir., 350 Village Drive, Frankfort, KY 40601; 502-848-0055 or 800-735-9791, Fax 502-848-0032 e-mail knla@mis.net
URL: http://www.knla.org
or Danny Summers at SNA, 770-953-3311; Fax 770-953-4411; SNA Infoline, 770-953-4636; e-mail, danny@mail.sna.org;
URL: http://www.sna.org

September 30 - October 1, 2005:
Middle Tennessee Nursery Association Horticultural Trade Show.
McMinnville Civic Center, McMinnville, TN
For more information contact Ann Halcomb by: phone: 931-668-7322; fax: 931-668-9601; e-mail: mtna@blomand.net,
http://www.mtna.com/ or http://www.southeasternnursery.com/mtna/

August 24-26, 2006:
The Farwest Show.
Portland, Oregon, Oregon Convention Center.
Contact Aimee Schendel, Oregon Association of Nurserymen, 29751 SW Town Center Loop West, Wilsonville, OR 97070; 800-342-6401; 503-682-5089 x 2006; Fax, 503-682-5099; e-mail, info@farwestshow.com
URL: http://www.farwestshow.com

October 6-7, 2006:
Middle Tennessee Nursery Association Horticultural Trade Show.
McMinnville Civic Center, McMinnville, TN
For more information contact Ann Halcomb by: phone: 931-668-7322; fax: 931-668-9601; e-mail: mtna@blomand.net,
http://www.mtna.com/ or http://www.southeasternnursery.com/mtna/

August 23-25, 2007:
The Farwest Show.
Portland, Oregon, Oregon Convention Center.
Contact Aimee Schendel, Oregon Association of Nurserymen, 29751 SW Town Center Loop West, Wilsonville, OR 97070; 800-342-6401, 503-682-5089 x 2006; Fax, 503.682.5099; e-mail, info@farwestshow.com
URL: http://www.farwestshow.com

October 5-6, 2007:
Middle Tennessee Nursery Association Horticultural Trade Show.
McMinnville Civic Center, McMinnville, TN
For more information contact Ann Halcomb by: phone: 931-668-7322; fax: 931-668-9601; e-mail: mtna@blomand.net,
http://www.mtna.com/ or http://www.southeasternnursery.com/mtna/

Send horticultural questions and comments to ktilt@acesag.auburn.edu.

Send questions and comments to fischbr@auburn.edu.

Letters to Bernice Fischman - 101 Funchess Hall - Auburn University, AL 36849.