July, Clethera is blooming, and you forget how HOT it gets in Alabama! It is a great time to think about air conditioned learning opportunities that always hit about this time of the year beginning with SNA. The Alabama Nursery and Landscape Association, with great help from a Risk Management Grant and the Alabama Cooperative Extension System, is adding something new to our educational offerings, Business Management! We have always done a good job with production issues but we hear often that help is needed on business concerns. On August 17 and 18 at the new Robert Trent Jones Grand National Golf Course Conference Center, we will be offering a full slate of educational opportunities concerning marketing, labor, surviving OSHA regulations, customer relations, tax and estate planning, record keeping and other topics that give the real money side information for your businesses. Please review the program below. All the speakers are not just business people talking generalities but green industry people that know nurseries and landscape businesses. The subsidies from the Risk Management grant allow us to offer the program at a $50 registration fee. That is an incredible bargain! Also note that the program ends by 4 each day so those who like golf can bring your clubs and play on the premiere course in the Trail tour. Every hole is a signature hole with beautiful views. There is lots of water so bring extra balls. For more information contact Linda VanDyke at 334-821-5148 or email alna51@bellsouth.net

If I was going to chart out my educational stops for the summer and fall, I would begin with SNA offerings of research and educational seminars (see www.SNA.org) beginning August 12th through the 14th, followed by the Risk Management Seminars at Auburn August 17th and 18th (see below and at www.alna.org/) followed by the Southern Region IPPS meeting (www.ipps.org/SouthernNA) in Greenville, SC on October 24th 27th and for the landscape industry the AU Fall Landscape School on November 4th and 5th is an unqualified must-do event. I tell (preach to) every new grower in our industry that after you join ALNLA, the greatest learning opportunity you have is to become an active member of IPPS (International Plant Propagators Society). There is no greater opportunity to gain new ideas and learn from others' mistakes than to attend regional and international meetings of this group of nursery professionals. Greenville, South Carolina is close and would be a good chance to have a taste. I assure you it is addicting and profitable. The formal educational programs are great but you can pick up many ideas from 400 to 500 nurserymen standing around the coffee pot, at dinner, or sitting on the buses while nursery hopping. For the future of your business and because it is fun, BE THERE! Dr. Sibley and I are taking a bus-load of students to the meeting because we feel that this is one of the greatest opportunities and experiences we can expose them to before entering into the profession.

A reminder for the brave pioneering charter group of professionals seeking the exalted status of Alabama Certified Landscape Professional, the plant ID and written exam will be given at the SNA meeting. The practical exam will be given on November 5th at Auburn. You will also be able to take the written exam in January at the Gulf States Horticulture Expo in Mobile. Call Linda VanDyke with ALNLA at 334-821-5148 or email her at alna51@bellsouth.net to get the manual and study materials. More information is available on the ALNLA web site at www.alna.org.

Be the first to get an edge on your competition and separate yourself from the non-professionals. When you display on all your business cards, advertisements and trucks that you are an Alabama Certified Landscape Professional, you are guaranteeing your customers that you have the knowledge to service their landscape needs. If you do not have this earned recognition, you will have to work hard to sell your competence. It is a recognized symbol of excellence for landscape contractors in Georgia and will soon become the litmus test for securing a landscape professional in Alabama.

So, Get out of the heat and join us for the good of your business! Hope to see you at SNA.

Ken

C O N T E N T S
RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION SEMINAR
FIELD DAY AT NORTH ALABAMA HORTICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER
NURSERY FLOOR AND PLANT GROWTH
HERITAGE AND HYDRANGEAS
SHOOT FORMATION IN INDIAN HAWTHORN
PROPAGATION OF LACEBARK ELMS BY STEM CUTTINGS
CLONAL PROPAGATION OF OAKS
THE IMPORTANCE OF FERTILIZER PLACEMENT OF HERBICIDE RATES
GALLERY, SURFLAN AND TREFLAN AND THE CONTROL OF COMMON NURSERY WEEDS
SEASONAL EFFECTS ON TRANSPLANTING OAKS
TO DIP OR NOT TO DIP - AUXINS AND WOODY LANDSCAPE PLANTS
PLANT PATHOLOGY REPORT - MAY 2004
UPCOMING EVENTS

DISCLAIMER: Please remember that all information presented is a summary of research and not an endorsement of any product or a recommendation of chemicals. The official labels from the manufacturing companies offer the legal and proper use and handling information for all products.


RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION SEMINAR

August 17-18, 2004
The Lodge and Conference Center at Grand National
Opelika, AL

August 17, 2004 - GENERAL SESSION
9:30-9:40 Introduction and Welcome
.Linda Van Dyke
9:40-10:50 Overview of Risk Management Alternatives in the Green Industry
.Jim Novak, Auburn University
10:50-12:00 Tax and Estate Planning: Legal Issues for the Green Industry
.James Bridges, Attny Auburn
12:00 Lunch
1:00-2:10 Risk Management Outlook
.Paul Walden, Risk Mgmt Agency
2:10-3:20 Who is OSHA and What are They Looking For?
.Bill Bice, OSHA
3:20-3:45 Break
3:45-4:15 Managing Labor Issues
.Moriah Bellenger, Auburn
August 18, 2004 - BREAKOUT SESSIONS
8:00-9:00 Opening Session - Maintaining Records for OSHA
.Bill Bice, OSHA
Session A: Nursery & Greenhouse Producers
9:30-10:45 Coordinated Marketing Strategies
.Charles Hall, University of Tennessee
10:45-12:00 Tools for Making Financial Decisions
.Deacue Fields, Auburn University
12:00-1:00 Lunch
1:00-2:15 Budgeting, Planning and Maintaining Financial Records
.Roger Hinson, Louisiana State Univ.
Session B: Lawn and Landscape Service Providers
9:30-10:45 Business Planning and Marketing Strategies
.Forrest Stegelin, University of Georgia
10:45-12:00 Business Analysis and Maintaining Customer Relationships
.Ron Rainey, University of Arkansas
12:00 - 1:00 Lunch
1:00-2:15 Estimating, Bidding and Contract Negotiation Strategies
.Charles Hall, University of Tennessee
2:15 - 2:45 General Assembly - Adjourn

Overlooking the award winning Links Course on Alabama's Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail at Grand National, The Lodge and Conference Center offers a golf and business retreat setting on par with world class facilities. Situated on the shores of Lake Saugahatchee in Opelika, Alabama.

From Montgomery: 1-85 North to the Hwy. 280 Exit at Opelika (exit #58). Go West on Hwy. 280 following the signs for the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail to Lee County 97 (Grand National Pkwy.) and turn right. Travel 2.5 miles to Sunbelt Pkwy. Turn right onto Sunbelt Pkwy. and travel 2 miles to the entrance to The Lodge and Conference Center at Grand National.

From Atlanta: 1-85 South to the Hwy. 280 Exit at Opelika (exit #58). Go West on Hwy. 280 following the signs for the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail to Lee County 97 (Grand National Pkwy.) and turn right. Travel 2.5 miles to Sunbelt Pkwy. Turn right onto Sunbelt Pkwy. and travel 2 miles to the entrance to The Lodge and Conference Center at Grand National.

From Birmingham: Hwy. 280 East: to Auburn/Opelika following the signs for the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail to Lee County 97 (Grand National Pkwy.) and turn Left. Travel 2.5 miles to Sunbelt Pkwy. Turn right onto Sunbelt Pkwy. and travel 2 miles to the entrance to The Lodge and Conference Center at Grand National.

From Columbus, GA: Hwy. 280 East: to Opelika. Continue on Hwy. 280 after merging with 1-85 south take exit #58. Go West on Hwy. 280 following the signs for the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail to Lee County 97 (Grand National Pkwy.) and turn right. Travel 2.5 miles to Sunbelt Pkwy. Turn right onto Sunbelt Pkwy. and travel 2 miles to the entrance to The Lodge and Conference Center at Grand National.

COME EARLY OR STAY LATE AND PLAY GOLF
During the month of August, fees are: Greens Fees $40.00; Cart Fee $15.00; Room Rates are: Single/Double $89.00


FIELD DAY AT NORTH ALABAMA HORTICULTURE RESEARCH CENTER

The following photographs are from the Vegetable and Ornamental Horticulture Field Day at the North Alabama Horticulture Center in Cullman that was held on June 24.


Ken Tilt has to talk above all the oohs and aaahs of his audience as he discusses the performance data on dozens of hydrangea cultivars planted underneath tall pines at the North Alabama Horticulture Research Center. The hydrangea stop was the most popular of the tour.


Field Day attendees listen as Wayne Chestnut, a graduate student in horticulture at Auburn University, gives the highlights from his research into the effects of shade on peony growth. The overall goal of the "Quest for the Southern Peony" project, Chestnut says, is to find peony species and cultivars that will tolerate the heat and humidity of the South and to develop best management practices for nurseries and landscapes. The peonies being used in the study were brought to Alabama from the Wuhan province of China.


NURSERY FLOOR AND PLANT GROWTH

Nursery floor materials are rather varied and can include gravel, white clam or oyster shell mulch, black plastic, ground fabric over black plastic. In this study 'Skogholm' cotoneaster was grown on four different nursery floors: black plastic, black ground fabric over black plastic, white plastic and gravel. The smallest plants were those grown on white plastic. These plants also had reduced N and P efficiencies. The difference probably has to do with increased canopy and substrate temperatures. It is clear that white surfaces should be avoided when choosing a nursery floor.

(from "Nursery Floor Affects Containerized Plant Growth" by Stuart L. Warren and Ted E. Bilderback, published in the Journal of Environmental Horticulture 22(2):100-105. 2004).

HERITAGE AND HYDRANGEAS

It is important to control soil-borne diseases on herbaceous and woody ornamentals. Heritage 50WTM was the first broad-spectrum fungicide registered for this purpose. In 1998, used at a rate of 4 ounces per 100 gallon rate, powdery mildew and Cercospora leaf spot were controlled on hydrangeas. Eagle 40WTM had been the industry standard until that time. Heritage rates as low as 1 ounce per 100 gallons significantly reduced the incidence of powdery mildew on hydranega. However, application must be made in intervals no longer than two weeks. If you use Heritage and alternate that with Compass OTM for an extended period of time, there could possibly be a control failure due to similar chemistry and possible development of resistance. If you use Quinone, it can make up no more than 1/3 of the total number of applications in a disease management program on any ornamental crop and no more than 2 consecutive applications of this type of fungicide can be made. Heritage can be tank mixed with a different fungicide for up to half of the applications. SunSpray Ultra-Fine OilTM works well against powdery mildew. Use it as an alternative to synthetic fungicides or as a rotation partner with/Quinone for a resistance management program.

(from "Impact of Application Rate and Interval on the Control of Powdery Mildew and Cercospora Leaf Spot on Bigleaf Hydragea with Azoxystrobin" by A.K. Hagan, J.W. Olive, J. Stephenson, and M.E. Rivas-Daila published in the Journal of Environmental Horticulture 22(2):58-62. 2004.

SHOOT FORMATION IN INDIAN HAWTHORN

To prepare Indian hawthorn for sale is very labor intensive as multiple prunings are required to produce well-branched, compact plants. Three weekly applications of BA (1250 to 2500 ppm) results in the stimulation of lateral bud break. Foliar injury was minimal. BA is not labeled for use on Indian hawthorn. If concentrations above 2500 ppm BA are used there can be abnormal leaf curling and discoloration of foliage.

(from "BA-Induced Shoot Formation in Indian Hawthorn" by Jayme M. Oates, Gary J. Keever, and J. Raymond Kessler, Jr., published in the Journal of Environmental Horticulture 22(2):71-74. 2004).

PROPAGATION OF LACEBARK ELMS BY STEM CUTTINGS

There are many things that recommend lacebark elms for a variety of landscape situations. They are usually heat, drought, and cold tolerant trees that can be grown in many soil conditions and are good street trees. Importantly, they are resistant to Dutch elm disease, Japanese beetles and elm leaf beetles. The "Emerald Prairie' lacebark elm grows rapidly, has dark green foliage and superior resistance to black leaf spot. This elm can be rooted successfully at softwood and semi-hardwood growth stages. Softwood cuttings did better when treated with 15,000 or 20,000 ppm of K-IBA.
(from "Propagation of Ulmus parvifolia 'Emerald Prairie' by Stem Cuttings" by Jason J. Griffin and Kenneth R. Schroeder, published in the Journal of Environmental Horticulture 22(2):55-57. 2004).

CLONAL PROPAGATION OF OAKS

Oaks, because of their environmental adaptability and genetic variation, can be improved by clonal selection. 500 ppm of Provide (R) applied every fourth day increased budbreak and resulted in more treatable shoots. Using acetone and ethanol and severely cutting back the stock plant improves rooting. Stock plants in this study were 2-6 years old and there was no decrease in rooting of the shoots. This container layering technique is a means of propagating oaks asexually.

(from "Clonal Propagation of Quercus Spp. Using a Container Layering Technique" by J. Naalamle Amissah and Nina L. Bassuk, published in the the Journal of Environmental Horticulture 22(2):80-84. 2004).

THE IMPORTANCE OF FERTILIZER PLACEMENT ON HERBICIDE RATES

Weed control is a critical matter for growers. This study demonstrated that the placement of fertilizer impacts the integrity of herbicides used. There are also other factors that can compromise the effectiveness of herbicides, for example, weeds that have some tolerace to a particular herbicide. CRF placement influences weed control with herbicides. The technique of dibbling (placing the fertilizer below the liner rootball when potting) reduced the germination of some weeds (groundsel and prostrate spurge) and reduced subsequent growth of these and other weeds. Dibbling fertilizer reduced weed establishment and growth across herbicide rates compared to topdressing or incorporating. It is suggested that herbicide rates could be reduced by making changes in the management of fertilizer.

(from "Fertilizer Placement and Herbicide Rate Affect Weed Control and Crop Growth in Containers" by James E. Altland, Glenn B. Fain, and Kathy Von Arx, published in the the Journal of Environmental Horticulture 22(2):93-99. 2004).

GALLERY, SURFLAN AND TREFLAN
AND THE CONTROL OF COMMON NURSERY WEEDS

Growers are always trying to minimize the need for hand weeding in their container nursery crops. The timing of herbicide applications could reduce the need for hand weeding. In this study surface-applied Treflan rates for susceptible grass species were 0.7 to 1 lb of active ingredient per acre in the greenhouse and 2.3 to 3 lbs of active ingredient outdoors for 6 weeks after treatment. To achieve equivalent control outdoors, 3 weeks after treatment an additional 1.3 to 1.7 pounds of active ingredient per acre were needed as it appeared rapid herbicide losses were incurred outside. The development of a model that could predict when herbicides have dissipated would ultimately reduce the need for hand weeding.

(from "Dose and Concentration Responses of Common Nursery Weeds to Gallery, Surflan and Treflan" by Caren A. Judge, Joseph C. Neal and Jerome B. Weber, published in the Journal of Environmental Horticulture 22(2):106-112. 2004).

SEASONAL EFFECTS ON TRANSPLANTING OAKS

This research studied early root system regeneration in an attempt to ascertain whether spring (March) or fall (November) is the best time to transplant northern red oak and willow oak. To determine when roots resume growth following transplanting, height and trunk growth were studied. Only in early spring were roots observed within or outside of root balls of those transplanted in the fall. Height and trunk diameter on red oak did not increase with November transplanting while November transplanted willow oaks had greater trunk expansion than the March transplants. Red oak survival was 100%; the transplanted willow oak did not fare as well - 67% survived the November transplanting and 83% survived the March transplanting.

(from "Seasonal Effects of Transplanting on Northern Red Oak and Willow Oak" by Lisa E. Richardson-Calfee, J. Roger Harris, and Jody K. Fanelli, published in the Journal of Environmental Horticulture 22(2):75-79. 2004).

TO DIP OR NOT TO DIP - AUXINS AND WOODY LANDSCAPE PLANTS

Auxins are root promoting chemicals that are often applied to stem cuttings in a nursery setting. Traditionally, auxin was introduced to the plants by manually dipping stem cuttings into an auxin solution. This research examined the effectiveness of applying auxin by adding it to the substrate which would allow stems to be exposed for a much longer period of time and would also minimize the danger of frequently exposing nursery employees to chemicals during the dipping process. Other benefits would be lowered production costs with improved labor processes and automation.

This research demonstrated that woody stem cuttings can be rooted successfully in an auxin-treated, stablized organic substrate (plugs were comprised of peat and a polymer binder). Research results suggest that this method can be very successful with a variety of plant species but there are variables to be considered (for example: stage of growth of the stock plant, rooting environment, compostion of the substrate).

(from "Auxin Appliation to Stem Cuttings of Selected Woody Landscape Plants by Incorporation Into a Stabilized Organice Rooting Subsstrate: by Eugene K. Blythe, Jeff L. Sibley, Ken M. Tilt, and John M. Ruter, published in the Journal of Environmental Horticulture 22(2):63-70. 2004).

PLANT PATHOLOGY REPORT

AUBURN AND BIRMINGHAM PLANT DISEASE REPORTS - MAY 2004
Jackie Mullen
Extension Plant Pathology Specialist

Jim Jacobi
Extension Plant Pathology Specialist-Birmingham

Charles Ray
Research Fellow IV-Auburn

Auburn Plant Disease Report - May 2004
(Jackie Mullen)
May was a busy month in the lab with 156 plant samples received. Commonly seen diseases on ornamentals were Heterosporium (Cladosporium) on Iris and black spot on rose. Moisture levels in May ranged from adequate in some area to slightly below adequate in some areas.

MAY 2004 Plant Diseases Seen In The Auburn Plant Diagnostic Lab
PLANTPROBLEMCOUNTY
BermudaBipolaris BlightJefferson
BermudaExserohilum BlightJefferson, Shelby
BermudaHelminthosporium Leaf Spot/Crown RotMarion
BermudaSting NematodeMarion
Blueberry, TifbluePhytophthora Crown & Root Rot*
CentipedeBrown Patch (Rhizoctonia)Chilton, Lee, Montgomery, Pike
Cherry, WeepingBotryosphaeria Canker*
DaylilySuspect Kabatiella StreakMarshall
GrassSlime MoldTuscaloosa
HollyAlternaria Leaf SpotMarshall
HoneysuckleAnthracnose (Colletotrichum sp.)Choctaw
HydrangeaAnthracnose (Colletotrichum)Houston, Mobile
IrisHeterosporium Leaf SpotLee
IrisPythium Root RotTallapoosa
Leyland CypressFusarium Root RotLee
Leyland CypressPestalotia Needle BlightPike
Mountain LaurelPythium Crown/Root RotTallapoosa
NandinaPythium Crown & Root RotLee
NandinaRhizoctonia Root RotLee
OakOak Leaf Blister (Taphrina)DeKalb
OxalisRust (Puccinia)Lee
PalmAlternaria BlightMontgomery
Pear, BradfordFireblight (Erwinia amylovora)Russell
Pine, LoblollyColeosporium Needle RustTallapoosa
Pine, LoblollyRhizosphaeria Needle BlightTallapoosa
St. AugustineBrown Patch (Rhizoctonia)Mobile
St. AugustineSlime MoldChoctaw
St. AugustineTake-All Patch (Gaeumannomyces)Jefferson
VioletCercospora Leaf SpotLee
ZoysiaBrown Patch (Rhizoctonia)Montgomery
ZoysiaSuspect Winter DamageJefferson
*Counties are not reported for greenhouse and nursery samples.

Birmingham Plant Disease Report - May 2004
(J. Jacobi)
We received 147 samples during May. The most common problem on ornamentals was powdery mildew (crapemyrtle, phlox, and rose). We also saw Kabatina tip blight on eastern red cedar, Rhizoctonia stem rot and Pythium root rot on garden impatiens.

MAY 2004 Plant Diseases Seen In The Birmingham Plant Diagnostic Lab
PLANTPROBLEMCOUNTY
AsterPowdery MildewJefferson
AzaleaAzalea Bark ScaleJefferson
AzaleaPythium Root RotJefferson
AzaleaSouthern Red MitesJefferson
BermudagrassAlgaeJefferson
BermudagrassBlack Layer/Poor Drainage*
BermudagrassDollar Spot (Sclerotinia)Shelby
Birch, RiverSpiny Witch-Hazel Gall AphidsJefferson
Boxwood, AmericanBoxwood Leaf MinerJefferson
Boxwood, AmericanPythium Root RotJefferson(2)
Butterfly BushSpider MitesShelby
Camellia, CommonCamellia Dieback (Colletotrichum)Shelby
Camellia, SasanquaCamellia Leaf Gall (Exobasidium)Jefferson
Cedar, Eastern RedKabatina Tip BlightShelby
CentipedegrassBrown Patch (Rhizoctonia)Jefferson
Cherry LaurelAlgal Leaf SpotJefferson
CrabappleFire Blight (Erwinia)Shelby
Crape MyrtlePowdery MildewShelby
Cypress, LeylandBotryosphaeria CankerJefferson
Cypress, LeylandSeridium CankerJefferson
ForysthiaPhomopsis DiebackJefferson
GardeniaCitrus WhiteflyJefferson
HickoryDowny Leaf Spot (Microstoma)Jefferson
HickoryHickory ShuckwormJefferson
HickoryPhylloxera GallsJefferson
Holly, ChineseCottony Camellia ScaleJefferson (3)
Holly, YauponArmillaria Root RotShelby
Hydrangea, BigleafSpider MitesJefferson
Hydrangea, OakleafVole DamageJefferson
ImpatiensPythium Root RotShelby
ImpatiensRhizoctonia Crown RotJefferson
JuniperPhytophthora Root RotJefferson
JuniperPythium Root RotShelby
Magnolia, SouthernAlgal Leaf Spot (Cephaleuros)Jefferson
Magnolia, SouthernBlack Twig BorerJefferson (2)
Oak, PostOak Galls (Cynipid Wasp)Jefferson
Oak, WhiteSlime FluxJefferson
Oak, WhiteWool Sower GallsShelby
Pear, BradfordFire Blight (Erwinia)Jefferson
Phlox, GardenPowdery MildewShelby
PhotiniaEntomosporium Leaf SpotJefferson
Pine, Eastern WhitePine Bark Aphid/Sooty MoldJefferson
Pine, LoblollyNeedlecast (Plioderma)Jefferson
RoseBlack SpotShelby
RosePowdery MildewJefferson (2)
RoseSpider MitesJefferson
RoseThrips/Flower DamageJefferson
Spruce, Colorado BlueBark BeetlesJefferson
St. AugustinegrassFairy RingJefferson
St. AugustinegrassGray Leaf SpotTuscaloosa
St. AugustinegrassSlime MoldJefferson
Tea OliveSouthern Red MiteJefferson
ZoysiagrassBrown Patch (Rhizoctonia)Shelby/Jefferson (3)
Zoysiagrass Dollar Spot (Sclerotinia)Tuscaloosa
Zoysiagrass Leaf Rust (Puccinia)Jefferson
Zoysiagrass White GrubsJefferson
Zoysiagrass Zoysiagrass Mites (Eriophyid)Jefferson
*Counties are not reported for greenhouse and nursery samples.

MAY 2004 Insects Identified at the Auburn Plant Diagnostic Lab (C. Ray)
COUNTY CROP CATEGORY SPECIMEN NAME
Lauderdale Structure Household-Miscellaneous Springtails
Etowah Crates Structural-Miscellaneous Huntsman Spider
Mobile Home Household-Miscellaneous Moth Fly (=Drain Fly)
Pike Peach Wood Boring Eastern Subterranean Termite
Clay Home Structure Drywood Termite Fecal Pellets
Pike Maple Ornamental Cottony Maple Scale
Autauga Plasticware Household-Miscellaneous American Cockroach
Colbert Home Ornamental Dark Winged Fungus Gnat
Escambia Home Structural Eastern Subterranean Termites
Monroe Household Structural Eastern Subterranean Termites
Montgomery Pampas Grass,
Bradford Pear,
Maple, Birch
Ornamental Land Snail
Henry Daylily Ornamental Spider Mites & Scolothrips sp.
DeKalb Unknown Miscellaneous Nymphal Assassin Bug
Cullman Home Structural Eastern Subterranean Termites
Mobile Azalea Ornamental No pest detected
Blount Pine Bark Wood Products Cossonus Weevil
DeKalb Oak Ornamental Gouty? Oak Gall
Covington Flowering Planting Ornamental Nymphal Stinkbugs
Houston Annuals and Perennials Ornamental A leaf beetle (no common name)
Mobile Birch Ornamental Asian Ambrosia Beetle Bagwood, Tarsonemid Mites
Russell Magnolia grandiflora Ornamental No Pests Detected - Tarsonemid Mites Present
Choctaw Home Stored Product Lesser Grain Borer and Maize Weevil
Baldwin Drake Elm Ornamental No Pest Detected
Autauga Bahia Sod Turf No Pest Detected
Lee Holly Ornamental Mealybugs, Armored Scales, Whiteflies
Morgan Gardenia Ornamental Nymphal Stink Bug


UPCOMING EVENTS

August 12-14, 2004:
Southern Nursery Association Trade Show and Educational Seminars.
Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, GA.
For more information go to
www.SNA.org

August 17-18, 2004:
Risk Management Education Seminar
Robert Trent Jones Grand National Golf Course Conference Center
Opelika, AL.
For more information contact Linda VanDyke at 334-821-5148 or alna51@bellsouth.net

August 20, 2004: Tri-State sHort Course.
West Florida Research and Education Center (WFREC) in Milton, Florida.
8:30 am to 5:30 pm.
For more information go to:
http://wfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/faculty/gibson/2004_Tri-State_sHort_Course.htm or contact Robin Vickers (850) 983-5126 ext. 113.

Another educational venue that is fast approaching is the 2004 Tri-State sHort Course. The 2004 Tri-State sHort Course will take place at the West Florida Research and Education Center (WFREC) in Milton, FL on Friday, August 20 from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm. The sHort Course was developed by Commercial Floriculture Extension Specialists Rick Schoellhorn (Univ. of Florida), Bodie Pennisi (Univ. of Georgia), and Raymond Kessler (Auburn University). Landscape and turfgrass, homeowner and grower information will be presented in three education tracks. For more information go to: http://wfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/faculty/gibson/2004_Tri-State_sHort_Course.htm or contact Robin Vickers (850) 983-5126 ext. 113. August 26-28, 2004:
The Farwest Show. Portland, Oregon, Oregon Convention Center.
Contact Aimee Schendel, Oregon Association of Nurserymen, 29751 SW Town Center Loop West, Wilsonville, OR 97070; 800-342-6401; 503-682-5089 x 2006; Fax, 503-682-5099; e-mail, info@farwestshow.com;
URL: http://www.farwestshow.com

October 1-2, 2004:
Middle Tennessee Nursery Association Horticultural Trade Show.
McMinnville Civic Center, McMinnville, TN
Contact Ann Halcomb, MTNA Exec. Secr., P.O. Box 822, McMinnville, TN 37111-0822; phone: 931-668-7322; fax: 931-668-9601; e-mail: mtna@blomand.net,
http://www.mtna.com/ or http://www.southeasternnursery.com/mtna/

October 3-6, 2004:
IPPS Southern Region NA
Greenville/Spartanburg, S.C.
Contact: Dr. David L. Morgan, 332 Warbler Drive, Bedford, TX 76021; phone 817-577-9272; e-mail, dleemorgan@msn.com

November 4-5, 2004:
Auburn University Fall Landscape School.
Auburn University. More information will be posted on our site when available. Contact Dr. Dave Williams (334-844-3032 or jdwillia@acesag.auburn.edu)

August 25-27, 2005:
The Farwest Show.
Portland, Oregon, Oregon Convention Center.
Contact Aimee Schendel, Oregon Association of Nurserymen, 29751 SW Town Center Loop West, Wilsonville, OR 97070; 800-342-6401; 503-682-5089 x 2006; Fax, 503-682-5099; e-mail, info@farwestshow.com
URL: http://www.farwestshow.com

September TBA, 2005:
The Southern Plant Conference.
Louisville, Kentucky.
Contact: Matt Gardiner, KY Coordinator, 502-245-0238: e-mail, matthew624@aol.com; or Betsie Taylor, KNLA Exec. Dir., 350 Village Drive, Frankfort, KY 40601; 502-848-0055 or 800-735-9791, Fax 502-848-0032 e-mail knla@mis.net
URL: http://www.knla.org
or Danny Summers at SNA, 770-953-3311; Fax 770-953-4411; SNA Infoline, 770-953-4636; e-mail, danny@mail.sna.org;
URL: http://www.sna.org

September 30 - October 1, 2005:
Middle Tennessee Nursery Association Horticultural Trade Show.
McMinnville Civic Center, McMinnville, TN
For more information contact Ann Halcomb by: phone: 931-668-7322; fax: 931-668-9601; e-mail: mtna@blomand.net,
http://www.mtna.com/ or http://www.southeasternnursery.com/mtna/

August 24-26, 2006:
The Farwest Show.
Portland, Oregon, Oregon Convention Center.
Contact Aimee Schendel, Oregon Association of Nurserymen, 29751 SW Town Center Loop West, Wilsonville, OR 97070; 800-342-6401; 503-682-5089 x 2006; Fax, 503-682-5099; e-mail, info@farwestshow.com
URL: http://www.farwestshow.com

October 6-7, 2006:
Middle Tennessee Nursery Association Horticultural Trade Show.
McMinnville Civic Center, McMinnville, TN
For more information contact Ann Halcomb by: phone: 931-668-7322; fax: 931-668-9601; e-mail: mtna@blomand.net,
http://www.mtna.com/ or http://www.southeasternnursery.com/mtna/

August 23-25, 2007:
The Farwest Show.
Portland, Oregon, Oregon Convention Center.
Contact Aimee Schendel, Oregon Association of Nurserymen, 29751 SW Town Center Loop West, Wilsonville, OR 97070; 800-342-6401, 503-682-5089 x 2006; Fax, 503.682.5099; e-mail, info@farwestshow.com
URL: http://www.farwestshow.com

October 5-6, 2007:
Middle Tennessee Nursery Association Horticultural Trade Show.
McMinnville Civic Center, McMinnville, TN
For more information contact Ann Halcomb by: phone: 931-668-7322; fax: 931-668-9601; e-mail: mtna@blomand.net,
http://www.mtna.com/ or http://www.southeasternnursery.com/mtna/

Send horticultural questions and comments to ktilt@acesag.auburn.edu.

Send questions and comments to fischbr@auburn.edu.

Letters to Bernice Fischman - 101 Funchess Hall - Auburn University, AL 36849.