JANUARY 2000

Happy New Year to all of our friends! Let's hope that the new year will be productive, peaceful, healthy and fun for all of you. This is a short newsletter as Auburn University was closed for the past two weeks. We'll be spending January getting ready for the Gulf States Horticultural Expo at the end of the month and also catching up on things. See you in February!

Bernice Fischman


The following articles are featured in this month's Something to Grow On:

ENCYCLOPEDIC NATIVE PLANT WEB SITE

GULF STATES HORTICULTURAL EXPO PROGRAM

HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE GRANTS

WEB SITES OF INTEREST

GARDENING IN TENNESSEE

MONTHLY REPORT FROM THE PLANT PATHOLOGY LAB

DISCLAIMER: Please remember that all information presented is a summary of research and not an endorsement of any product or a recommendation of chemicals. The official labels from the manufacturing companies offer the legal and proper use and handling information for all products.


ENCYCLOPEDIC NATIVE PLANT WEB SITE

Texas A&M University has just released a new web site that features more than 780 photos of 227 native tree species. The photos were taken by Benny J. Simpson during a long career of native plant research. Simpson died suddenly three years ago and his legacy has been catalogued and assembled by Wayne Mackay, research horticulturist at TAMU, Dallas, and Leslie Finical, Dallas Arboretum plant curator. The URL is http://dallas.tamu.edu/native/


GULF STATES HORTICULTURAL EXPO PROGRAM

MOBILE CONVENTION CENTER
MOBILE, ALABAMA

Wednesday, January 26, 2000
8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.Exhibitor Move-In and Set Up
9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.Registration Open
Thursday, January 27, 2000
6:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Exhibitor Move-in and Set-up
6:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.Registration Open
8:30 a.m. - 12:00 noon Educational Keynote Speakers
DETAILS BELOW
1:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.Concurrent Educational Seminars
DETAILS BELOW
6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.Welcome Reception at the
GULF COAST EXPLOREUM*
Sponsored by Flowerwood Nursery,
Martin's Nursery,
The Lerio Corporation,
Tom Dodd Nurseries, and
Twin Oaks Nursery. New location -
Same great food!
Friday, January 28, 2000
7:30 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.
Rom 203B
Alabama Nurserymen's Association
Annual Meeting and Awards Ceremony
7:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.Registration Open
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.TRADE SHOW OPEN
9:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.Ladies Program (Ticket required)
All ladies invited to join
First Lady Melinda Howell (MS),
Susan Webb (LA) and
Cherry Kinney (AL)
for coffee in the President's Suite
followed by lunch at the historic Marriott's
Grand Hotel in Point Clear.
Spend the afternoon shopping in the
quaint shops in downtown historic Fairhope.
10:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon
Room 204A
THE ALABAMA CERTIFIED NURSERY
PROFESSIONAL exam
5:00 p.m.Trade Show Closes
Saturday, January 29, 2000
8:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.Registration Open
8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
Room 204B
ANLA TOWN MEETING
Connect with ANLA leadership and fellow members for a discussion of key issues for the millennium, as well as ideas for increasing the value of membership. Feedback will be collected and reported to the ANLA board. All ANLA members are welcome
and complimentary refreshments will be served.
To attend, simply call (202) 789-5980,
ext. 3010, fax (202) 789-1893, or e-mail
(epiggott@anla.org) Erica Piggott at
ANLA headquarters and tell who
will be attending.
9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.Trade Show Open

*The Exploreum is located across the street from the Mobile Convention Center and the Adam's Mark Hotel.

DETAILS OF THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM:

GENERAL SESSION - WEST BALLROOM
8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. - Dr. Allan Armitage - "Trends as I see them"
9:30 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. - Break
9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. - Dr. Lawrence Helms - "Oh, if I only knew THEN, what I know NOW"
10:45 - 11:00 a.m. - Break
11:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon - Mr. Phil Nilsson - "Stay Small or Keep Growing"

CONCURRENT EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS
timeNURSERY SESSION
ROOM 204A
RETAIL SESSION
ROOM 204B
GREENHOUSE SESSION
ROOM 203A
1:00-1:40Dr. Lawrence Helms
Exhibitor Training
Mrs. Judy Sharpton
Store Design & Merchandising - Ideas for Retail Development
Dr. Allan Armitage (UGA)
Specialty Annuals for the Milennium
1:45-2:30Dr. Mel Garber (UGA)
Potential Mechanism for Exporting your Nursery Stock
Dr. Allen Owings (LSU)
Ornamental Plant Evaluations - Proven Results for Proven Performance
Dr. Paul Thomas (UGA)
Raising the Bar on Vinca and Pansy Production
2:35-3:10Dr. Ed Bush (LSU)
Cyclic Irrigation - Environmentally & Economically Great for Production
Mr. Norman Winter (MSU)
New Plants to Bring in More Dollars
Dr. Rich Schoellhorn (UF)
Using Plant Growth Regulators
3:15-4:00Dr. Charles Gilliam (AU)
Keeping Weeds Out of Your Annuals and Perennials
Dr. Mel Garber (UGA)
Hot Plants for Your Garden Center
Mr. Jeff Warschauer (NEXUS Greenhouse Corp.)
What's New in Greenhouse Technology
4:05-4:45Mr. Dan Bremer
Stabilize Your Workforce
Dr. Larry Helms
Marketing in the Green Industry
Dr. Jeff Kuehny (LSU)
Try Something New in Your Greenhouse, Garden Center and Landscape
4:50-5:30Mr. Mark Halcomb (UT)
Pre-dig B&B, Store and Ship Later (Benefits of Clover in Row Middles)
Dr. Ken Tilt (AU)
Convenient No Hassle Shopping: Ideas for Dollars
Dr. David Tatum (MSU)
When Pesticides Don't Work

CONCURRENT SESSIONS FROM 1:00 TO 5:00 p.m.

JOB ESTABLISHMENT WORKSHOP
ROOM 203B
Mr. Phil Nilsson of Nilsson Associates

LANDSCAPE WORKSHOP
ROOM 201A
Dr. Joe Eakes (AU)
Low maintenance landscape from design to installation to maintenance.

TREE WORKSHOP
ROOM 201B
Dr. A.D. Ali
Dr. Elizabeth Buchanan
(Davey Resource Group)

1. Woody Ornamentals - Proper Planting Techniques
2. Woody Ornamentals - Proper Pruning Techniques
3. Mature Woody Ornamentals - When to Hold and When to Fold
Insect identification and biology: The Bad Guys and the Good Guys

TO DOWNLOAD A REGISTRATION FORM CLICK ON THIS LINK: http://www.ALNA.org/expo/registrationform00.html and fax to 888-272-3251.


HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE GRANTS

The Horticultral Research Institute has released $425,000 in research grants for the year 2000. The grants are divided by percentages in the following categories:

Animal Pest Control - 10%
Disease Control - 11%
Financial/Business Management - 4%
Insect Control - 15%
Labor and Mechanization - 34%
Marketing - 8%
Nutrient/Water Management - 4%
Propagation and New Plants - 6%
Scholarships - 2%
Weed Control - 6%

Congratulations to Auburn University faculty and students who have received research grants to fund the following projects:

Fate of Nitrogen Captured by Recycled Paper Pellets in the Bottom of Containers, J. Sichivitsa, C. Gilliam, J. Edwards, P. Knight, Auburn University with Mississippi State University (for $10,000).

Post-emergence Broadleaf Weed Control in Container Grown Crops, J.Altland, C.Gilliam and J. Olive, Auburn University (for $5,000).

Controlled Delivery of Herbicides in Container Grown Ornamentals, G. Fain, C. Gilliam, T. Grey, J. Edwards and G. Wehtje, Auburn University with the University of Georgia (for $15,000).


WEB SITES OF INTEREST
From the Newletter of the Virginia Urban Forest Council, Summer 1999, come these recommended web sites:

http://members.aol.com/nancyhugp/
This site, Earth Works, offers a list of deer-resistant trees, shrubs, flowers, herbs and ground covers.

http://www.amfor.org
You can calculate your 'cost' to the environment with the American Forests formula. It tells you how many trees you need to plant to offset your 'carbon debt'.

http://www.epa.gov/safewater/dwinfo.htm
This site details drinking water information, regulations, protection programs, and more.

The following site comes from Turfgrass Producers International. It answers many questions that homeowners often have about their turf:

http://www.TurfGrassSod.org
Questions that are not answered on the site can be e-mailed to the staff who will research the question.

(from the VNLA Newsletter, November/December 1999).

GARDENING IN TENNESSEE

Gardening is an incredibly popular American hobby. As soon as one gets involved in planting plants and caring for them an avalanche of questions and concerns can surround one. The people of Tennessee are getting a bit more information to aid them in this pursuit. The University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Gardens in Knoxville are a living laboratory that the public is invited to visit. Funding for the gardens is also supported by Friends of the Gardens, a group of interested gardeners and industry professionals. You can visit their website: http://www.korrnet.org/gardens/.

Plant evaluation data is published each year in a UT Agricultural Experiment Station Research Report which is sent to industry supporters or anyone else desiring a copy. You can contact the UT Departament of Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape at 423-974-7324 to request a copy.

(from the TNLA Newletter, December 1999).

MONTHLY PLANT PROBLEM REPORT
FROM THE PLANT DIAGNOSTIC LAB - NOVEMBER

by Jackie Mullen

DISEASES SEEN IN THE PLANT DIAGNOSTIC LAB IN OCTOBER

PLANT DISEASE COUNTY
Cypress, Leyland Armillaria RootRotPickens
EuonymusScab (Elsinoe)Washington
Fescue, Tall Pythium Blight Baldwin
Mondograss Anthracnose (Colletotrichum)Madison
Mondograss Pythium Root Rot Madison
Oak Powdery Mildew (Phyllactinia)Montgomery
Pansy Pythium Crown/Root RotLee,Montgomery
Zoysia Brown Patch (Rhizoctonia)Lee
*Locations are not reported for nursery and greenhouse samples.

DISEASE POSSIBILITIES FOR DECEMBER

December is usually our month of least plant samples and most paper work catch-up as well as lab inventories and re-organization. Our usual December diseases include black rot (Xanthomonas campestris) and Cercospora leaf spots on crucifers in the southern sections of the state. The list below includes some common disease problems received in the lab during December of the past few years. Comments on control practices are brief. Refer to the Alabama Pest Management Handbook for details. Also, remember that sanitation is important in most control situations.

DISEASE DESCRIPTIONS AND BRIEF CONTROL COMMENTS
ON SOME COMMON DISEASES OFTEN SEEN IN DECEMBER

PLANTDISEASEDESCRIPTIONCONTROL
AZALEAPowdery Mildew
(Microsphaera)
(Greenhouse location)
White, buff-colored dusty coating on leaves.Apply a protective fungicide (See Alabama Pest Management Handbook); sanitation.
AZALEA Cercospora Leaf Spot
(Stress Related)
Brown, circular-irregular spots (1/4 to 1/2 inch, 0.6-1.2 cm diam.) on yellowed or otherwise weakened/stressed plants. Remove stress factors; sanitation.
BEDDING PLANTSBacterial Leaf Spot
(Greenhouse location)
Wet, water-soaked/black spots become dried and cracked in the centers with water-soaked margins.Sanitation; reduce humidity; increase spacing between plants; see Alabama Pest Management Handbook.
BEDDING PLANTSPythium Root Rot
(Greenhouse location)
Roots become brown and water-soaked.Sanitation; see handbook; reduce irrigation schedule.
BOXWOODMacrophoma BlightFoliage turns reddish, yellow or brown with small black dots (about 1 mm diam.) scattered across leaf surfaces.Remove stress situation; sanitation.
DIANTHUSAnthracnose
(Colletotrichum)
Reddish brown irregular spots on foliage.Sanitation; Cleary's 3336 may help.
DIANTHUSRhizoctonia Shoot BlightBrown elongated lesions.Sanitation; see Alabama Pest Management Handbook.
DIANTHUSOedemaSmall, corky, slightly raised spots on lower leaf surfaces sometimes accompanied by yellowish spots on corresponding upper leaf surfaces.Reduce watering on cloudy days.
FERN, BOSTONRhizoctonia Aerial BlightBlight areas on fronds.See 1998 recommendation.
GERANIUMBotrytis BlightSpots and blight may develop on leaves, flowers, stems. When humidity is high, a gray mold will develop.Sanitation; increase temperatures; increase air circulation to decrease humidity; protective fungicides.
GERANIUMPhytophthora Stem RotLower stem areas become black and water-soaked.Sanitation; see Alabama Pest Management Handbook.
HOLLYPhytopthora Root RotRoots, especially feeder roots, show a wet, water-soaked, rotted condition where the outer layer easily slips off the central cylinder.Sanitation; see the Alabama Pest Management Handbook.
JUNIPERPhytophthora Root RotRoots, especially feeder roots, show a wet, water-soaked, rotted condition where the outer layer slips off the central cylinder.Sanitation. See the Alabama Pest Management Handbook.
LIGUSTRUMCercospora Leaf SpotLarge, brown circular, oval or sometimes angular leaf spots. Sometimes spots have dark brown borders.Sanitation; protective sprays of Cleary's 3336 or Domain.
MONDOGRASSAnthracnose
Colletotrichum
Brown blotches on leaf blades; blotches may begin at leaf tips or they may be centrally located on the leaf blade.Cleary's 3336 or Domain; protective sprays; sanitation
PANSYBotrytis Bud RotBuds become brown, sometimes with gray over-tones. Sanitation. See 1998 recommendations.
PANSYMyrothecium Crown RotPlants wilt and yellow and dieback. Crowns become brown and limp; sometimes tiny white and black cushions are visible on crowns. Sanitation. Daconil treatments may give some protective control.
PANSYPythium Crown Root RotDark brown, water-soaked decay at crown area. Sanitation. See handbook.
PANSYThielaviopsis Root RotBlack lesions on stunted roots. Plants stunted. Sanitation. See handbook.
POINSETTIABotrytis Blight
(Greenhouse location)
Gray-brown blotches on foliage; during humid conditions a delicate fungal wet may be present over blotch areas.Increase temperatures; decrease humidity; sanitation; see Alabama Pest Management Handbook.
POINSETTIAPythium Root Rot
(Greenhouse location)
Roots are brown and water-soaked; outer root tissues slide easily away from inner root core.Sanitation; See Alabama Pest Management Handbook.
POTHOSBacterial Leaf Spot
(Erwinia)
Angular, dark, water-soaked spots on foliage.Sanitation; do not irrigate over-head.
ROSECrown Gall
(Agrobacterium)
Hard, rough-surfaced galls on the lower cane near the soil-line and on the roots.Remove infected plants. Keep area free of susceptible plants for 2-3 years. Avoid wounds.
SNAPDRAGONRhizoctonia Stem CankerBrown sunken cankers on lower stems.Sanitation; Cleary's 3336 or Domain.
TULIPPenicillium Bulb RotBrown blotches on bulb, sometimes with green/gray spore masses.See Alabama Pest Management Handbook for dip recommendations.
VINCAPhytophthora Root RotRoots are brown, water-soaked and the surface tissues will slip easily off the central root cylinder with a small amount of pressure.Sanitation; see Alabama Pest Management Handbook.
VINCAPhythium Root RotRoots are brown, water-soaked and the surface tissues will slip easily off the central root cylinder with a small amount of pressure.Sanitation; see Alabama Pest Management Handbook.
VINCAThielaviopsis Root RotRoots show black lesions and blotches. Tops grow poorly.Keep potting mix or soil pH on the low side of normal, about 5.5-6.0. Cleary's or Domain drenches may help.

MONTHLY PLANT PROBLEM REPORT
November was mostly warm (60-70-80 degrees F) and dry, except for a few cold nights where freezing temperatures occurred in the northern sections of the state. We saw mostly landscape and turf disease problems. Diseases seen include the following: Armillaria root rot of Leyland cypress; scab on euonymus; Pythium blight of tall fescue; anthracnose, Pythium root rot of mondograss; powdery mildew of oak; Pythium crown/root rot of pansy.

Armillaria root rot is a problem on a wide variety of trees especially when trees are stressed and weakened. Roots become infected by mycelium threads (rhizomorphs) which grow through the soil from infected roots. Once roots are infected, root decay progresses. When much of the root system is affected, the tree will rapidly decline and die. Tree removal is necessary when disease occurs. See ANR-907 for more information.

Scab on euonymus is a fairly common disease. Small, brown slightly raised spots develop on the leaves and stems. Severely affected leaves may turn yellow and drop. Cleary's 3336 sprays may help control this disease.

Anthracnose of mondograss is also fairly common on mondograss and liriiope. Decay spots occur on leaves and leaf tips or leaf edges. Tiny black dots (fruiting bodies) may be seen with a hand lens. Diseased plants should be cut back and hen treated two-hree times with a protective fungicide treatment. See the Alabama Pest Management Handbook.

Powdery mildew is commonly seen when temperatures are mild 70-85 degrees F during days and cool (60-75 degrees F) at night. It is not surprising that we saw powdery mildew on oak, considering our recent temperatures. Disease was recognized by the typical white dusting on leaf surfaces. Cleary's 3336 may be used as a spray to help control this disease. Fallen leaves should be removed from the area. See ANR-407.

Pythium crown/root rot on pansy was fairly common this fall. The stem at the soil line becomes light brown and soft. Often the tissues will decay severely and the lower stem completely deteriorates. Plants wither and die. Diseased plants should be removed. Care should be taken to avoid wet conditions, if possible. Improve soil drainage if possible. See the Alabama Pest Management Handbook for fungicide control rercommendations.

John Olive at the Mobile Ornamental Horticulture Substation reported seeing Alternaria and Cercospora leaf spots on poinsettia. Both leaf spots are brown or gray. The Cercospora spots tend to be more brown in color and the Alternaria spots are often more of a gray color. But, spots may be difficult to distinguish by symptoms. In addition, John noted a rust disease and foliar nematode damage on lantana. Rust diseases are usually recognized by orange-colored spots on the foliate. Foliar nematodes cause angular, water-soaked, brown-black spots which sometimes may be confused with bacterial spots.


UPCOMING EVENTS
January 19-21, 2000:
Mid-AM Trade Show.
Navy Pier, Chicago, IL. Contact Don W. Sanford at 847-526-2010, fax 847-526-3993; e-mail midam@mc.net

January 27-29, 2000:
The Gulf States Horticultural Expo
Mobile Convention Center.
Educational Seminars and Trade Show
Call 334-502-7777 for more information.

January 29-February 2, 2000:
Southern Region American Society for Horticultural Science Annual Convention.
Lexington, KY. Contact Paul Smeal at 1107 Kentwood Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24060-5656, 540-552-4085; fax 540-953-0805; e-mail psmeal@vt.edu

February 3-6, 2000:
The Management Clinic.
Galt House, Louisville, KT. Contact ANLA at 202-789-2900;
http://www.anla.org

March 18, 2000 - September 17, 2000:
Japan Flora 2000 'Communication Between Man and Nature'.
Awaji Island, Japan. See http://web.pref.hyogo.jp/jpnflora/english/index.htm or Meg VanSchoorl at MVANSCHOOR@agr.wa.gov

June 1-3, 1999:
Mid-South Greenhouse Growers Conference.
Ramada Inn - Southwest Conference Center in Jackson, MS. More information will be available soon or you can contact Allen Owings, Extension Horticulturist at LSU.

July 8-12, 2000:
Ohio Florists' Association Short Course and Trade Show.
Greater Columbus Convention Center. Contact OFA at 614-487-1117; e-mail ofa@ofa.org; web: http://www.ofa.org

July 11-16, 2000:
American Nursery & Landscape Association Annual Convention.
Location TBA; contact ANLA at 202-789-2900; http://www.anla.org

July 16-19, 2000:
American Society for Horticultural Science 97th International Conference.
Disney Coronado Springs Resort, Orlando, FL. Contact ASHS at 703-836-4606; fax 703-836-2024; e-mail ashs@ashs.org

August 3-6, 2000:
SNA 2000 - Southern Nurserymen's Association Researchers' Conference and Trade Show.
Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, GA. Contact SNA at 770-973-9026; SNA Infoline at 770-973-4636; http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/~isa

October 1-4, 2000:
Eastern Region International Plant Propagators' Society Annual Meeting.
Hyatt Regency Oak Brook, Chicago, IL. Contact Margot Bridgen, 26 Woodland Road, Storrs, CT 06268; phone 860-429-6818; e-mail mbippser@neca.com

October 8-11, 2000:
Southern Region International Plant Propagators' Society.
Norfolk, VA. Contact David Morgan at 817-882-4148; fax 817-882-4121, SR IPPS, P.O. Box 1868, Ft. Worth, TX 76101; e-mail dmorgan@bsipublishing.com

January 27-31, 2001:
Southern Region American Society for Horticultural Science Annual Convention.
Fort Worth, TX. Contact Paul Smeal at 1107 Kentwood Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24060-5656, 540-552-4085; fax 540-953-0805, e-mail psmeal@vt.edu

August 2-5, 2001:
SNA 2001 - Southern Nurserymen's Association Researcher's Conference and Trade Show.
Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, GA. Contact SNA at 770-973-9026; SNA Infoline at 770-973-4636; http://www.sna.org

January 27 - January 31, 2001:
Southern Region American Society for Horticultural Science Annual Convention.
Fort Worth, TX. Contact Paul Smeal, 1107 Kentwood Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24065-5656; phone 540-552-4085; fax 540-953-0805; e-mail: psmeal@vt.edu

August 2-5, 2001:
Southern Nursery Association Resarcher's Conference and Trade Show.
Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, GA. Contact SNA at 770-973-9026; SNA Infoline: 770-973-9026; SNA Infoline: 770-973-4636; http://www.sna.org

September 30 - October 3, 2001:
Eastern Region International Plant Propagators' Society Annual Meeting.
Lexington, KY. Contact Margot Bridgen, 26 Woodland Road, Storrs, CT 06268; phone 860-429-6818; e-mail mbippser@neca.com

October 18-21, 2001:
Southern Region International Plant Propagators' Society.
Houston, TX. Contact David Morgan at 817-882-4148; fax: 817-882-4121; SR IPPS, P.O. Box 1868, Ft. Worth, TX 76101; e-mail: dmorgan@bsipublishing.com

Send horticultural questions and comments to ktilt@acesag.auburn.edu.

Send questions and comments to bfischma@acesag.auburn.edu.

Letters to Bernice Fischman - 101 Funchess Hall - Auburn University, AL 36849.