February 1999


Greetings everyone!

We are all recovering from efforts spent getting ready for and attending the Gulf States Horticultural Expo. The general concensus is that it was a great show, a wonderful first cooperative effort between Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. The educational seminars were a big success; the main problem seemed to have been not enough chairs for everyone in attendance. The following are photos I took as I walked around the trade show. It was a visual feast. Spring appears to be almost upon us. Enjoy it.

Until March,
Bernice Fischman


DISCLAIMER: Please remember that all information presented is a summary of research and not an endorsement of any product or a recommendation of chemicals. The official labels from the manufacturing companies offer the legal and proper use and handling information for all products.

THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES ARE FEATURED IN THIS MONTH'S
SOMETHING TO GROW ON:

1. NEWS FROM THE GULF STATES HORTICULTURAL EXPO BY J. RAYMOND KESSLER, JR.

2. EVALUATION OF LANTANA CULTIVARS FOR THE LANDSCAPE

3. PESTICIDE PRESCRIPTIONS

4.PLANTS FOR WET PLACES

5. SOIL, WATER, PH AND ALKALINITY - HOW THEY INTERACT

6. METHYL BROMIDE UPDATE

7. ROSE NAMED AFTER DIANA, PRINCESS OF WALES

8. TRYING NOT TO SAY GOODBYE TO WASHINGTON'S CHERRY BLOSSOMS

9. TIME TO BRUSH UP ON YOUR ITALIAN

10. UPDATE ON FUNGUS GNATS

11. FROM THE SUPERMARKET TO THE FIELD

12. WEB SITE REVIEW: CENTER FOR URBAN HORTICULTURE

13. JACKIE MULLEN'S PLANT DISEASE NOTES

14. THE ZEIGLER FAMILY PRESENTS TREE TO GOVERNOR JAMES

15. UPCOMING EVENTS


NEWS FROM THE GULF STATES HORTICULTURAL EXPO BY J. RAYMOND KESSLER, JR.

The Nursery Associations for Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi held the first Gulf States Horticultural Expo in Mobile, AL on January 28 - 30, 1999. Educators and industry representatives from the three states held concurrent education programs on Thursday, January 28 in landscape design, nursery production, garden center management and greenhouse production. Total attendance was 4109 for the entire show with 547 registered for the education program. The greenhouse education program featured talks on basic greenhouse practices and new or different crops for production. Attendance reached a high of 104 during the greenhouse program.

The three Nursery Associations sponsored a joint trade show from 9:00 AM Friday, January 29 to 3:00 PM Saturday, January 30. The trade show had 516 booths with 355 companies exhibiting products and services covering the range of the nursery and greenhouse industry.

Charles Beaty Hanny of Landscape Services in Atlanta, GA received the ANA Lifetime Achievement Award at the Alabama Nurserymen's Association Board meeting Friday morning. The Horizon Award went to Jason Powell of Petals From The Past in Jemison, AL. Landscape awards were also given to Landscape Services in Atlanta, GA, Landscape Workshop in Birmingham, AL and Gadsden Lawn & Landscape in Gadsden, AL.

New officers for the Alabama Nurserymen's Association in the coming year include Joe Kinney, President; David Bradford, Vice-President; Vicki Nelson, Secretary-Treasurer; Harvey Cotten, Director; Bill Cook, Director and Bob Moore, Director at Large.

Everyone agreed that the education program and trade show was a tremendous success and plans are underway to expand the show next year.


THE ZEIGLER FAMILY PRESENTS TREE TO GOVERNOR JAMES

The Zeigler family is shown above at the Governor's Mansion on the day they presented the tree from their Christmas Tree Farm for display at the mansion.


EVALUATION OF LANTANA CULTIVARS FOR THE LANDSCAPE

The LSU Agricultural Center has been conducting a landscape trial evaluation of lantana cultivars since 1995 (1998 is the end date). The categories in their study are: evaluation of plants for floral impact; growth habit; pest resistance (spider mites, lantana lace bugs, aphids and whiteflies); and fruiting resistance.

Lantana are winter hardy in south Louisiana. They were planted in raised landscape beds in full sun and irrigated as needed. Plants were fertilized according to a schedule but not dead headed or pruned during the growing season. No pesticides were used.

The evaluations are used by the Louisiana green industry and have led to Silver Mound, New Gold, Dallas Red, Trailing Purple and Confetti being named Louisiana Select cultivars in 1997.

Flowering percentage of landscape planted lantana cultivars - 1997
CULTIVARMAYJUNJULAUGSEPOCTAVG
Samantha30301510103021
New Gold25304015153026
Weeping White20151515403523
Spreading Sunset60352510103028
Lemon Drop25454535253535
Gold Mound35505035302538
Golden King20202010102517
Irene20353020153526
LSG Red-Gold40404535253537
Silver Mound30555515156539
Patriot Firewagon35302520103025
Lemon Swirl10202520154523
Patriot Rainbow10252530404028
American Red Bush15353030204028
Imperial Purple30202535657542
Radiation40304010106032
Dallas Red40404525105035
White Lightnin'20202520605033
Confetti25354025155032
Patriot Cherry15303030201523
Patriot Desert Sunset15252535304028
Cream30354045304037
Patriot Dove Wings15405565202036
Patriot Sunburst30353060405041
Patriot Tangerine25404555401537
Lady Olivia35352510101021
Patriot Honeylove25403520155031
New Bronze20203525154026
Dwarf Pink25351540303530
NOTE: Flowering percentage is expressed as the percent of the plant covered by open blossoms.

(from SNA poster presentation by Allen D. Owings and Kris M. Leader, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, published in 1998 SNA Proceedings)

PESTICIDE PRESCRIPTIONS

The Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST) has suggested a new approach for using high risk pesticides. They are suggesting a system similar to the medical profession. People self medicate with lower potency over-the-conter medication but must go to a physician to get a prescription for more powerful, higher risk medicines. If prescriptions were required for high risk pesticides, the result of the practice could be the promotion of safer alternatives and the more prudent use of high-risk chemicals. The down side of this proposal, if implemented, would mean more regulation. The EPA will be debating this issue all year as it decides the fate of organosphosphates, carbamates and B-2 carcinogens. To see the paper by CAST go to http://www.cast-science.org/pres_ip.htm.

(from the Alabama Pesticide Information Sheet, Vol. 3, No. 1, 7 January 99).


PLANTS FOR WET PLACES

Cruising the Internet I found a list of plants that tolerate wet conditions. It was compiled at NC State University by Dr. Tom Ranney and others. This is a question I often get from landscape design professionals and home gardeners. I thought I would share it with you in its entirety and also send you to their web site: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu./depts/hort/hil/ which offers other jewels of the horticulture industry. It was published in February 1994, leaflet no. 646:

QUALIFIERS FOR QUAGMIRES: LANDSCAPE PLANTS FOR WET SITES

Wet, poorly drained soils present one the most difficult challenges for growing plants in the landscape. Excessive moisture displaces oxygen in the soil and plant roots can suffocate as a result. Many plants are intolerant of having their roots submerged for extended periods of time. Even though standing water may not be present, poor drainage is often responsible for reduced growth and survival of plants in our landscapes.

When landscaping sites with poor drainage it is advisable to start with plants that are tolerant of those conditions. Plants native to wet bottomland areas often thrive under these conditions. When selecting and planting trees and shrubs for poorly drained sites, it is important to recognize that plants often need to acclimate to these conditions before they are able to tolerate flooding and low aeration. Even plants that are very tolerant of poor drainage will have shallower root systems on poorly drained sites. Over time, physiological and anatomical changes in the plant can also help to improve tolerance to poor drainage. As a result, it is often desirable to start with small plants that have been grown under conditions as similar to the planting site as possible when planting trees and shrubs on poorly drained sites.

Although many of plants listed in this leaflet can tolerate poor drainage, their growth will often be improved if more desirable growing conditions can be provided. Creation of raised beds, swales, grassed waterways, and drainage lines can help to divert and route excess water away from planting sites and should be considered if drainage is excessively slow.

Below is a list of candidate plants for the landscape that can tolerate varying degrees of wetness. Plants with an * following their name indicates that those species have been known to tolerate flooded conditions for extended periods of time.

TREES

Acer negundo (boxelder)
Acer platanoides (Norway maple)
Acer rubrum (red maple)*
Acer x freemanii (Freeman hybrid maple)*
Aesculus pavia (red buckeye)
Alnus glutinosa (black alder)
Amelanchier canadensis (serviceberry)
Betula nigra (river birch)*
Carya aquatica (water hickory)
Catalpa speciosa (catalpa)
Celtis spp. (hackberry)
Chamaecyparis thyoides (Atlantic white cedar)*
Diospyros virginiana (persimmon)
Fraxinus caroliniana (Carolina ash)
Fraxinus nigra (black ash)*
Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash)*
Fraxinus quadrangulata (blue ash)
Larix spp. (larch)
Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum)
Maclura pomifera (osage orange)
Magnolia grandiflora (southern magnolia)
Magnolia virginiana (sweetbay magnolia)*
Nyssa aquatica (water tupelo)*
Nyssa sylvatica (black gum)
Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora (Swamp Tupelo)*
Nyssa ogeche (ogeechee tupelo)
Pterocarya spp. (wingnut)
Picea glauca (white spruce)
Pinckneya bracteata (fevertree)
Pinus taeda (loblolly pine)
Platanus spp (planetree)*
Pseudolarix kaempferi (golden larch)
Pyrus spp. (pear)*
Quercus bicolor (swamp white oak)
Quercus laurifolia (laurel oak)
Quercus lyrata (overcup oak)
Quercus nigra (water oak)
Quercus nuttallii (nuttall oak)*
Quercus palustris (pin oak)*
Quercus phellos (willow oak)
Quercus virginiana (live oak)
Salix spp. (willow)*
Taxodium spp. (baldcypress)*
Thuja occidentalis (eastern arborvitae)
Thuja plicata (giant arborvitae)
Ulmus alata (winged elm)
Ulmus parvifolia (lacebark elm)

SHRUBS

Aronia arbutifolia (red chokeberry)
Baccharis halimifolia (groundsel tree)
Cephalanthus occidentalis (button bush)*
Clethra acuminata (cinnamon clethra)
Clethra alnifolia (summersweet)
Cornus alba (tartarian Dogwood)*
Cornus sericea (red osier dogwood)*
Cornus amomum (silky dogwood)*
Cyrilla racemiflora (swamp cyrilla)
Dirca palustris (leatherwood)
Euonymus americana (American euonymus)
Fothergilla spp. (fothergilla)
Hibiscus syriacus (rose-of-sharron)
Ilex cassine (dahoon holly)
Ilex glabra (inkberry)
Ilex verticillata (winterberry)*
Ilex vomitoria (yaupon holly)*
Illicium spp. (anise-tree)
Itea spp. (sweetspire)
Leucothoe fontanesiana (leucothoe)
Lindera benzoin (spicebush)
Myrica spp. (bayberry/waxmyrtle)
Physocarpus opulifolius (ninebark)
Rhamnus caroliniana (Carolina buckthorn)
Rhododendron arborescens (sweet azalea)
Rhododendron atlanticum (coastal azalea)
Rhododendron vaseyi (pinkshell azalea)
Rhododendron viscosum (swamp azalea)
Rosa virginiana (virginia rose)
Sambucus canadensis (elderberry)
Spiraea tomentosa (hardhack)
Vaccinium corymbosum (highbush blueberry)
Viburnum alnifolium (hobblebush)
Viburnum cassinoides (witherod viburnum)
Viburnum opulus (European cranberrybush viburnum)

HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS AND SHALLOW WATER/BOG PLANTS

Acorus calamus (sweet flag)*
Astilbe spp. (astilbe)
Butomus umbellatus (flowering rush)*
Calla palustris (bog arum)*
Caltha palustris (marsh marigold)*
Canna x generalis (Water canna)*
Carex spp. (sedge)
Eleocharis acicularis (spike rush)*
Eupatorium dubium (Joe Pye weed)
Equisetum hyemale (horsetail)*
Hibiscus moscheutos (rose mallow)
Iris ensata (Japanese water iris)*
Iris laevigata (water iris)*
Iris pseudacorus (yellow flag)*
Iris siberica (Siberian iris)
Iris vericolor (blue flag)*
Iris virginica (southern blue flag)*
Juncus spp. (rush)*
Leersia oryzoides (rice cutgrass)*
Lobelia cardinalis (cardinal flower)
Lobelia siphilitica (great lobelia)
Lysimachia clethroides (gooseneck loosetrife)
Myosotis scoparius (water forget-me-not)
Orontium aquaticum (golden club)*
Peltandra virginica (hardy arum)*
Pontederia cordata (pickerel weed)*
Sagittaria spp. (arrowwhead)*
Sarracenia spp. (pitcher plant)
Saururus cernuus (lizard's tail)*
Schoenoplectus validus (soft stem bulrush)*
Scirpus americanus (common threesquare)*
Spartina alterniflora (cordgrass)*
Typha spp. (cattail)*
Vernonia noveboracensis (iron weed)

Sources for more information on the plants listed above:
Armitage, A.M. 1989. Herbaceous perennial plants: A treatise on their identification, culture, and garden attributes. Varsity Press, Inc. Athens, GA.

Bir, R.E. 1992. Growing and propagating showy native woody plants. The University of North Carolina Press. Chapel Hill, N.C.

Dirr, M.A. 1990. Manual of woody landscape plants: Their identification, ornamental characteristics, culture, propagation and uses. Fourth edition. Snipes, Champaign, IL.

Aulbach-Smith, C.A. and S. J. de Kozlowski. 1990. Aquatic and wetland plants of South Carolina. S.C. Water Resources Commission, Columbia, S.C.

(by Thomas G. Ranney, Assistant Professor; Richard E. Bir, Extension Specialist; M.A. Powell, Professor/Extension Specialist; Ted Bilderback, Professor/Extension Specialist. Published by North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service)


SOIL, WATER, PH AND ALKALINITY - HOW THEY INTERACT

Alkalinity could be defined as the buffering capacity of water. It comes from bicarbonates and carbonates which cause growing media to increase in pH. Greater alkalinity results in water that is harder to acidify.

Calcium and magnesium carbonates form when soils that have been irrigated with water high in bicarbonates, calcium and magnesium, dry out. Every time the soil is irrigated additional calcium and magnesiuim carbonates are added. Soil pH levels increase and move above the desired level. High soil pH levels render zinc, iron and magnesium less available to plants (particularly container and greenhouse plants).

Water containing high concentrations of bicarbonate (above 50 mg/l) can cause increased pH and will need to be acidified. If you need to inject acid in your water, use proper skin and eye protection. Always add acid to water, never water to acid. Analyze water after this process to make sure you have achieved the desired results.

Growers need to be aware of the delicate balance required regarding water quality and fertilization. You can aggravate certain diseases by fertilizing excessively. It's very important to have a plan to control your water quality. Essential parts of that plan are: having a lab test your irrigation water annually; if acid is required get advice on the best type and concentration to apply. Purchase a pH and conductivity meter to help you monitor your water and fertilizer needs.

(from Dr. Hannah Mathers in Digger, June 1998).


METHYL BROMIDE UPDATE

Due to recent legislative actions by the United States Congress, the methyl bromide phaseout in the U.S. will be as follows (it was originally set to be phased out in 1999):

Preshipment and quarantine uses are exempt. Critical agricultural uses will be allocated after 2005. Consult the EPA website for more information on the phaseout: http://www.epa.gov/ozone/mbr/harmoniz.html

(from Wheeler Foshee, Pesiticide Education Specialist, Auburn University)


ROSE NAMED AFTER DIANA, PRINCESS OF WALES

A long stemmed, full-flowered classic white hybrid tea rose with a pink blush named after Diana, Princess of Wales, may be Jackson & Perkins' most popular rose variety in the company's history. Its long stem and sweet fragrance make it a desirable cut flower. Fifteen percent of retail sales will be donated to the Princess of Wales Memorial Fund.

(from David Morgan's NMPRO e-mail)


TRYING NOT TO SAY GOODBYE TO WASHINGTON'S CHERRY BLOSSOMS

Millions of American and international tourists have marvelled at the beauty of the Yoshino cherry trees that line the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C. Unfortunately, these lovely trees have begun to decline, an expected consequence of their age (they were a gift from Japan in 1912). The U.S. National Arboretum is propagating the few remaining original trees. Rooted cuttings will be presented to the National Parks Service in March.

(from David Morgan's NMPRO e-mail)


TIME TO BRUSH UP ON YOUR ITALIAN

October is a lovely time to visit Italy and the Wholesale Nursery Growers Association will take advantage of that. They are planning a nursery study tour in northern Italy. For more information call 202-789-2900.


UPDATE ON FUNGUS GNATS

After reading the January edition of Something to Grow On, we received an e-mail with information about the control of fungus gnats. In 1998 Valent USA Corp. introduced an additional insect growth regulator for the control of fungus gnats on ornamentals in greenhouses. The trade name is Distance IGR. For more information contact jcham@mindspring.com


FROM THE SUPERMARKET TO THE FIELD

It is a daunting job to inventory and grade field-grown trees. In about 3 years the same kind of technology that has almost eliminated cash registers in retail stores will be implemented in nurseries. Truck mounted laser and electric-eye technology will do the job. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University are adapting these tools to nursery situations so that the inventory process would be 3 to 5 times faster than current methods. Projected price is $5,000.
(from David Morgan's NMPRO e-mail)


WEB SITE REVIEW: CENTER FOR URBAN HORTICULTURE

Trees and plants are an important part of our lives. Perhaps not enough of the general population have thought about just how important they are. The Center for Urban Horticulture at the University of Washington has done some research on this issue. Their URL is http://www.cfr.washington.edu/enviro-mind/. The main issues addressed are the benefits of urban forestry (psychological and economic); business impacts and roadside forests. We are all aware of the physical presence of trees and plants but it is time to consider that they also have an impact on our emotional health, affecting stress and disease levels. The site also deals with how trees affect the property value of businesses and homes.


JACKIE MULLEN'S PLANT DISEASE NOTES

Monthly plant problem report: Pythium root rot of pansy and dwarf gardenia showed symptoms of dead roots. Recently infected roots appeared soft, wet, dark and rotted. Sometimes the outer root layer (cortex) will slip easily from the inner cylinder when a small amount of vertical pressure is applied with fingers. Old infections were decayed, brown and dried. Pythium is known as a root nibbler and may cause problems when soils are kept continuously wet. Corrective measures depend upon the specific situation, but usually plant replacement, improved soil drainage, sometimes soil replacement or treatment, and/or sometimes soil fungicide drenches (nursery situations) are among the control recommendations.

Extensive crown gall was present on a rose plant submitted. Lower canes (near the soil line) and roots contained spherical woody, rough-surfaced galls. Plant top growth was reduced. Control of crown gall is not convenient. Infected plants must be removed. The causal bacteria will remain in the soil for 2 years so susceptible plants (and there are many) should not be planted until after 2 years. Some plants tolerant to crown gall are boxwood, holly, and redbud. An alternative to crop rotation is soil replacement or soil fumigation, both of which are practices that may not be practical for logistical and cost considerations.

1998 December Plant Diseases Samples that were seen in the plant diagnostic lab:

DISEASE DESCRIPTIONS AND BRIEF CONTROL COMMENTS ON SOME COMMON DISEASES OFTEN SEEN IN JANUARY
PLANTDISEASEDESCRIPTIONCONTROL
AFRICAN VIOLETPhythium Root RotRoots become brown and wet rotted.Sanitation and reduce watering practices.
AZALEACercospora Leaf Spot Medium brown circular-irregular leaf spots (about 1/4 inch diam.).See the APMH; sanitation.
CAMELLIAAnthracnose (Colletotrichum)Circular-irregular brown-gray spots on leaves.Sanitation.Cleary's 3336.
FERNBotrytis BlightBrown discoloration of fronds and a gray fungal growth when conditions are cool and damp.Sanitation; protective fungicide drench treatments; see APMH.
FERNRhizoctonia Aerial BlightBrown irregular lesions on fronds.Sanitation; see APMH.
GERANIUMBacterial Leaf Spot
Pseudomonas)
See Foliage Plant Description.Sanitation. See the APMH.
GERANIUMOedemaSmall (1/8 inch diam. Or less), light brown, corky slightly raised spots scattered over lower leaf surfaces. Corresponding areas on upper leaf surfaces are yellowed spots. Brown discoloration of fronds and a gray fungal growth when conditions are cool and damp.Sanitation; protective fungicide drench treatments; see APMH.
GERANIUMPhythium Stem and Root RotBlack cankers (rotting) of lower stem, crown and roots..Sanitation; see the APMH.
GREENHOUSE CROPSBotrytis BlightGray-brown spots and blotches on the foliage. During moist, cool conditions, this fungus will produce a delicate gray web of fungal growth.Sanitation; see APMH.
GREENHOUSE CROPSDowny Mildew
(Peronospora)
Faded, yellow blotches on upper leaf surfaces. Lower leaf surfaces showed gray-purple, powdery masses of fungal growth.Reduce humidity; raise temperatures; refer to the APMH.
GREENHOUSE & NURSERY CROPSPythium/Phytophthora
Root Rot
Root tissues become brown and water-soaked. Foliage shows yellowing, wilt and/or dieback . See the APMH; sanitation; reduce watering schedules.
HELLERI HOLLY liners Thielaviopsis Root Rot
Black spots and areas on roots and root tips; foliage yellows, wilts, and/or shows dieback.Sanitation; Cleary's 3336, Domain drenches may help as a preventative measure. See the APMH.
HYDRANGEA Powdery MildewWhite, powdery dusting on leaves and shoots; dieback; blight.See the APMH.d>
PANSYAlternaria BlightSmall, brown, irregular lesions. Sanitation; Daconil may help.
PANSYBotrytis BlightGray or gray-brown circular-irregular spots/blotches on foliage.See the APMH; sanitation or ANR-596a.
PANSYPythium Root RotPlants unthrifty, wilt, yellow and die. Roots become brown and water soaked.See the APMH or ANR-596a.
PANSYRhizoctonia Foliage BlightSpots/blight of brown color.See the APMH.
PANSYThielaviopsis Root RotBlack spots and areas on roots and root tips. Plants wilt, yellow and die.Sanitation; Cleary's 3336 or Domain drenches, as a preventative measure, may give some control. See the APMH or ANR-596a..
PHOTINIAEntomosporium Leaf SpotRed-black circular-irregular spots on foliage; spots may coalesce; leaf fall will result.Sanitation; protective fungicide sprays; see the APMH or ANR-392.
SOUTHERN MAGNOLIAAlgal Leaf Spot
(Cephaleuros)
Green or reddish circular spots, usually 3-5 mm diam., slightly raised.See the APMH.
AMPH=Alabama Pest Management Handbook


UPCOMING EVENTS

February 4-7, 1999:
The Management Clinic.
Galt House, Louisville, KY. Contact ANLA at 202-789-2900;
http://www.anla.org

July 22-27, 1999:
American Nursery & Landscape Association Annual Convention.
Philadelphia, PA. Contact ANLA at 202-789-2900; http://www.anla.org

July 28-31, 1999:
96th American Society for Horticultural Science.
Minneapolis Convention Center, Minneapolis, MN. Contact ASHA: 703-836-4606, Fax: 703-836-2024; e-mail: ashs@ashs.org

July 30-August 1, 1999:
SNA 99 - Southern Nurserymen's Association Researcher's Conference and Trade Show.
Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, GA. Contact SNA at 770-973-9026; SNA Infoline at 770-973-4636; http://www.sna.org

August 1-4, 1999:
International Society for Arboriculture Annual Conference. Stamford, CT. Contact ISA at 217-355-9411; http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/~isa

September 10-11, 1999:
TNA's "Tennessee America's Nursery" Trade Show and Conference.
Opryland Hotel Convention Center, Nashville, TN. Contact TNA at 931-473-3971; fax 931-473-5883; e-mail nurseryassn@blomand.net

September 23-25, 1999:
6th Biennial Southern Plant Conference.
Richmond, VA. Contact SNA at 770-973-9026; SNA Infoline at 770-973-4636; http://www.sna.org

October 3-6, 1999:
Southern Region International Plant Propagators' Society.
Mobile, AL. Contact David Morgan: 817-882-4148, SR IPPS, P.O. Box 1868, Ft. Worth, TX 76101; e-mail dmorgan@bsipublishing.com

October 8 and 9, 1999:
Middle Tennessee Nursery Association Horticulture Trade Show.
Civic Center, McMinnville, Tennessee. For more information call 931-668-7322, fax 931-668-9601; e-mail: MTNA@blomand.net
www.growit.com/MTNA>p> November 4-6, 1999:
Gulf Coast Native Plant Conference
Camp Beckwith, Fairhope, Alabama
Featuring four habitats with guided field trips. For more information contact Thayer Dodd, Conference Coordinator, at 1-888-808-3633

January 11-13, 2000:
Kentucky Landscape Industries Winter Educational Conference and Trade Show.
The Lexington Center, Lexington, KY. Contact Debbie Cain, KNLA Exec. Dir. at 502-899-3622; fax 502-899-7922

January 19-21, 2000:
Mid-AM Trade Show.
Navy Pier, Chicago, IL. Contact Don W. Sanford at 847-526-2010, fax 847-526-3993; e-mail midam@mc.net

January 29-February 2, 2000:
Southern Region American Society for Horticultural Science Annual Convention.
Lexington, KY. Contact Paul Smeal at 1107 Kentwood Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24060-5656, 540-552-4085; fax 540-953-0805; e-mail psmeal@vt.edu

February 3-6, 2000:
The Management Clinic.
Galt House, Louisville, KT. Contact ANLA at 202-789-2900; http://www.anla.org

July 8-12, 2000:
Ohio Florists' Association Short Course and Trade Show.
Greater Columbus Convention Center. Contact OFA at 614-487-1117; e-mail ofa@ofa.org; web: http://www.ofa.org

July 11-16, 2000:
American Nursery & Landscape Association Annual Convention.
Location TBA; contact ANLA at 202-789-2900; http://www.anla.org

July 14-18, 2000:
Ohio Florists' Association Short Course and Trade Show.
Greater Columbus Convention Center. Contact OFA at 614-487-1117; e-mail ofa@ofa.org; web: http://www.ofa.org

July 16-19, 2000:
American Society for Horticultural Science 97th International Conference.
Disney Coronado Springs Resort, Orlando, FL. Contact ASHS at 703-836-4606; fax 703-836-2024; e-mail ashs@ashs.org

August 3-6, 2000:
SNA 2000 - Southern Nurserymen's Association Researcher's Conference and Trade Show.
Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, GA. Contact SNA at 770-973-9026; SNA Infoline at 770-973-4636; http://www.sna.org

August 11-18, 2000:
International Society for Arboriculture Annual Conference.
Baltimore, MD. Contact ISA at 217-355-9411; http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/~isa

September 15-16, 2000:
TNA's "Tennessee America's Nursery" Trade Show and Conference.
Opryland Hotel Convention Center, Nashville, TN. Contact TNA at931-473-3971; fax 931-473-5883; e-mail tnurseryassn@blomand.net

October 8-11, 2000:
Southern Region International Plant Propagators' Society.
Norfolk, VA. Contact David Morgan at 817-882-4148; fax 817-882-4121, SR IPPS, P.O. Box 1868, Ft. Worth, TX 76101; e-mail dmorgan@bsipublishing.com

January 27-31, 2001:
Southern Region American Society for Horticultural Science Annual Convention.
Fort Worth, TX. Contact Paul Smeal at 1107 Kentwood Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24060-5656, 540-552-4085; fax 540-953-0805, e-mail psmeal@vt.edu

August 2-5, 2001:
SNA 2001 - Southern Nurserymen's Association Researcher's Conference and Trade Show.
Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, GA. Contact SNA at 770-973-9026; SNA Infoline at 770-973-4636; http://www.sna.org

October 18-21, 2001:
Southern Region International Plant Propagators' Society.
Houston, TX. Contact David Morgan at 817-882-4148; fax: 817-882-4121; SR IPPS, P.O. Box 1868, Ft. Worth, TX 76101; e-mail: dmorgan@bsipublishing.com

Send questions and comments to bfischma@acesag.auburn.edu.

Letters to Bernice Fischman - 101 Funchess Hall - Auburn University, AL 36849.