Theses and Dissertations


Title: The effects of increased sodium chloride on the survival of striped bass, Morone saxatilis (Walbaum), fry and the effects of two feeding rates on the survival and production of advanced fingerling striped bass in earthen ponds

Name: Barwick, Dempsey Hugh

Degree: MS

Chair: Dr. E.W. Shell

Resides: FAA Library

University: Auburn

Location: Auburn, Alabama

Date: 1973

Pages: 56

Keywords: Sodium Chloride,Striped Bass,Feeding Rates,Earthen Ponds.

Abstract:

Investigation of the effects of increased sodium chloride concentrations on fry survival and of the effects of two feeding rates on advanced fingerling survival and production in 0.1-acre ponds was conducted at the Fisheries Research Unit of the Auburn University Agricultural Experiment Station from April 8 to November 24, 1972. Rock salt was used to raise the chloride concentration of the water in six ponds to approximately 550 ppm. The mean survival of fry in the increased chloride ponds was 7.64% as opposed to only 1.70% in six normal ponds where rock salt was not added. However, the percentage survivals in all ponds was highly variable ranging from 0.33 to 39.50% in ponds receiving rock salt and from 0.00 to 9.58% in the normal ponds. Survival in the increased sodium chloride ponds was not clearly higher. The fry utilized originated from two parental females and were kept separate throughout the experiment. The average survival of fry originating from one of the females was only 0.76% while that for fry originating from the other female was 11.99%. However, fry from the two females were not stocked in ponds at the same time, and it was not possible to establish conclusively that the quality of the fry directly affected survival. Research on the production of advanced fingerling striped bass was conducted in six ponds. The fish in three of the ponds received a high feeding rate while the fish in the remaining three ponds received a low feeding rate. The mean survival for fingerlings fed the high feeding rate was 71.87% as opposed to 70.13% for fingerlings fed the low feeding rate. The mean production for fingerlings receiving the high feeding rate was 266.51 kg/ha as compared to a production of 293.68 kg/ha for fingerlings fed the low feeding rate. It was not possible to confirm that the rates of feeding affected survival or production of the fingerlings. However, the fingerlings fed the high feeding rate had a mean S-value (kg feed fed/total kg fish produced by natural plus added feed) of 4.06 as opposed to 2.51 for fingerlings that received the low feeding rate.

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