Theses and Dissertations


Title: The effects of water hyacinths on plankton in fed channel catfish ponds

Name: Phanil, Charoen

Degree: MS

Chair: Dr. John S. Dendy

Resides: FAA Library

University: Auburn

Location: Auburn, Alabama

Date: 1972

Pages: 65

Keywords: Water Hyacinths,Plankton,Channel Catfish,Feeding.

Abstract:

Population of plankters were sampled from ponds on the Auburn University Agricultural Experiment Station, Auburn, Alabama, during the summer of 1971. These ponds were subjected to four experimental treatments: (1) no fertilization and no water hyacinths, (2) no fertilization but stocked with water hyacinths, (3) early fertilization and early stocking of water hyacinths, and (4) late fertilization and late stocking of water hyacinths. The thickness of layers of settled plankton measured in mm and the species with total number of plankters per liter were determined from each of the four treatments. Samples were taken at bimonthly intervals between May and October, 1971. Species identification was made by using stereo and compound microscopes. Volumetric determinations were made by a Sedgwick-Rafter counting cell under a compound microscope with 100x magnification and Whipple Ocular Micrometer. Fifty-five species of plankters were identified from all treatments. There appeared to be uniform species distribution throughout the treatments. The total plankters per liter varied with the treatment. The treatment of no fertilization and stocked with water hyacinths produced the least plankters. The treatment of no fertilization and no water hyacinths ranked third in quantity of plankters produced. Early fertilization and early water hyacinths produced the next highest amount of plankton. Late fertilization and late stocking of water hyacinths produced the greatest number of plankters. These results would indicate that the late fertilization stimulated the rapid growth of plankton, especially Anacystis cyanea. There was a significant difference in the numbers of plankters produced in ponds receiving no fertilization and no water hyacinths and in ponds receiving no fertilization but stocked with water hyacinths. The differences in means between all other treatments were not significant.

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