Auburn Fisheries Pioneer Explains Why Alabama Agriculture Can’t Catch Up

shell

Jamie Creamer wrote about Dr. Wayne Shell in the latest issue of Ag Illustrated.

“Eddie Wayne Shell has a suggestion for folks who buy his new book.

“It makes a mighty good doorstop,” he says. “You sure can’t do much else with it.”

At first glance, you might be tempted to agree. The 880-page volume is just shy of 2 inches thick, weighs in at 5.2 pounds and, from cover to cover, is nothing but text. Not the first picture, table or illustration to be found, page after 8 ½- by-11-inch page.

The title—“Evolution of the Alabama Agroecosystem: Always Keeping Up but Never Catching Up”—might be off-putting, too. 

But don’t let those details scare you away, because the exhaustive narrative that Shell, an Auburn University professor emeritus in fisheries, has produced is an absorbing, surprisingly readable account of how geological, biological, cultural, economic and political characteristics over the past 350 million years have shaped the state’s agricultural ecosystem. Most of the book’s focus, however, is on changes that have taken place in the past two centuries …”

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Former Fisheries Faculty Practices What He Preached Raising Inland Shrimp

David Teichert-Coddington working his shrimp farm.

David Teichert-Coddington working his shrimp farm.

Jamie Creamer featured former faculty member, David Teichert-Coddington in the spring issue of Ag Illustrated.

“About this time every year, David Teichert-Coddington packs his bag, loads his trailer and hits the road, bound for the Florida Keys.

If he were going for a few weeks of R & R, that would be one thing. But this is business, as will be evidenced four days and 1,850 miles later when a road-weary Teichert-Coddington returns to his west-central Alabama home, hauling a load of precious—and totally legal—cargo: 9 million pathogen-free, hatchery-grown baby shrimp. Shrimplets, if you will, each about the size of a gnat.

And thus begins another growing season at Greene Prairie Shrimp, a fitting name for a farming operation that’s in Greene County on 250 acres of prairie soil and for which the sole product is Pacific white shrimp …”

Read the rest of the article here.

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